Book Review: The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
Book Reviews / January 1, 2013

Kipling wrote this book in 1894 while living in India. Born to British parents in Bombay, he was raised and educated in England, and lived in England most of his life; but he spent many of his happiest years in India. The Jungle Book and its sequel, The Second Jungle Book, are testimonies to his fascination with the legends and natural wonders of the Subcontinent.

Book Review: Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling
Book Reviews / January 1, 2013

This book in particular was inspired by the deep-sea fisherman of the New England seaboard. And it is yet another “adventure at sea” that I recommend to lovers of magical worlds, on the rationale that the sea is very much another world, strange and even magical to many of us.

Book Review: The Monsters of Otherness by Kaza Kingsley
Book Reviews / January 1, 2013

In Book Two of Erec Rex the heir apparent to the magical kingdom of Alypium begins a series of magical tasks testing his claim to the throne. As Erec begins a new course of studies under a frankly dodgy pair of tutors, he faces a growing heap of challenges. The Stain brothers continue to contest Erec’s claim to the throne. Protest demonstrations and snarky memos show that he is hated by the people he is destined to rule. Meanwhile Erec keeps receiving suspiciously enthusiastic fan letters.

Book Review: Dave at Night by Gail Carson Levine
Book Reviews / January 1, 2013

This novel by the author of Ella Enchanted is loosely based on her father’s boyhood. Set in the Harlem (Upper Manhattan) Renaissance of the late 1920s, it concerns the adventures of a delightful rascal named Dave Caros, who finds himself at the Hebrew Home for Boys at the age of eleven.

Book Review: The Book of Animal Ignorance by John Lloyd & John Mitchinson
Book Reviews / January 1, 2013

The co-authors of The Book of General Ignorance are back with this tightly-written, riveting account of the most amazing facts about 100 kinds of animals, ranging from your backyard (or even inside your home) to the farthest reaches of the world. Decorated by Ted Dewan’s quirky but effective illustrations, the book draws laughs and blushes while it informs.

Book Review: The Savage Damsel and the Dwarf by Gerald Morris
Book Reviews / January 1, 2013

In Book 3 of The Squire’s Tales, a strong-willed girl makes her way to Camelot to demand a champion from King Arthur’s Round Table. She needs a strong knight to deliver her beautiful sister from a recreant knight who refuses to leave their castle in peace until Lady Lyonesse marries him. So Lady Lynet flees in search of help. What she finds is not what she expected.