Author Archives: Robbie

Book Review: The Serpent’s Shadow by Rick Riordan

SerpentsShadow

The third and (for now) final book in The Kane Chronicles begins with an apology “for any inconvenience the end of the world may have caused you.” As the story unfolds, narrated alternately by siblings Carter and Sadie Kane, you’ll become increasingly inclined to accept their apology. Some catastrophes are really hard to prevent. And though the young Kanes often feel responsible even for things that are out of their control, they are finally ready ... Read More »

Book Review: Odd Hours by Dean Koontz

OddHours

In the fourth Odd Thomas novel, a twenty-one-year-old ghost-whisperer continues his sabbatical from his career as a fry-cook. Every time he tries to get away from the stress of dealing with the dead, trouble finds him—bigger and nastier than ever. His small hometown in the Mojave desert wasn’t peaceful enough. His retreat to a mountaintop monastery was spoiled by a terrifying ordeal. And now it seems he can’t even lie low on a sunny California ... Read More »

Book Review: Conspiracies by F. Paul Wilson

Conspiracies

In The Tomb, Repairman Jack saved New York from a cargo ship full of monsters out of mankind’s darkest, oldest nightmare. In the sequel, Legacies, he helped his client figure out why a bunch of Saudi-oil-backed mercenaries were willing to kill for a secret hidden in her late father’s brownstone. By the time I came to Book 3 in this sixteen-book series, I didn’t know whether to expect a straight mystery-thriller or a novel of ... Read More »

Book Review: Legacies by F. Paul Wilson

Legacies

Jack, last name withheld, lives off the grid in New York City. He has no Social Security Number. He pays no income taxes. All his IDs are fake. As far as officialdom is concerned, he doesn’t exist. And that’s the way he likes it. “Repairman Jack,” as he is professionally known, fixes problems for a living. When people come to his website looking for someone to fix their broken appliances, he ignores them. When they ... Read More »

Book Review: Side Jobs by Jim Butcher

SideJobs

Here is a collection of eleven stories, ranging from very short up to novelette length, supplementing the novels of the Dresden Files. One was written before Storm Front, the very first Dresden novel, when Harry was still an apprentice detective and Jim Butcher was still learning to write. Another was suggested by his publisher as a promotional gimmick for one of his earlier books. One was written for this collection. And the rest were originally ... Read More »

Book Review: Seeds of Rebellion by Brandon Mull

Beyonders2

After reading the first book in the Beyonders trilogy, I decided to drop everything and go to the library to fetch Book 2. This turned into a whirlwind tour of five (5) library branches, after which I came home with two armloads of books to read. Happily, I was able to get my hands on this, the middle book of the trilogy, and read it with an exquisitely tuned balance between relish and haste. And ... Read More »

Review: A World Without Heroes by Brandon Mull

Beyonders1

Thirteen-year-old Jason is an ordinary, baseball-playing, zoo-volunteering kid from Colorado, until the day he hears music coming out of a hippopotamus. Leaning closer, he falls into the hippo’s mouth, slides down a long chute, and comes out at the bottom of a hollow tree in a completely different world. It’s not how most visitors from our reality find their way to the magical land of Lyrian. Later, Jason meets a girl his age named Rachel, ... Read More »

Book Review: Hot Lead, Cold Iron by Ari Marmell

HotLead

Give a Chicago private eye a magic wand and what do you get? Well, Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files, mostly. But Harry Dresden is a wizard of our time—a little rusty with high-tech gadgetry, to be sure, but also a VW Beetle-driving, pop-culture-riffing, very human wizard. One reviewer frequently quoted in jacket blurbs of the Dresden novels likens him to a mash-up of Philip Marlowe and Merlin. But actually, he’s a lot more like Richard Castle ... Read More »

Book Review: The Last Werewolf by Glen Duncan

LastWerewolf

Jake Marlowe gets the news in the first sentence of this book that he is the last of his kind. At age 200, he is only middle-aged for a werewolf. But his days are numbered. Solitary hunters by nature, werewolves have been unable to… er, reproduce… ever since a sort of sterility virus ensured that no one would survive being turned into one of the lycanthropic undead. And though the vampires envy their ability to ... Read More »

Book Review: Brother Odd by Dean Koontz

BrotherOdd

In Book 3 of the Odd Thomas series, the young fry-cook who sees dead people has retreated to a monastery in the mountains for a needed break from the stress of his quiet hometown. He only wants a little time to heal from two harrowing encounters with monsters in human form. But his respite is cut short by the appearance of bodachs at the abbey—or more precisely, in the school for mentally and physically disabled ... Read More »