Book Review: “Inkling” by John D. Waterman
Book Reviews / February 4, 2018

This is a lean, fast-paced book with some sharply defined characters, interesting social dynamics, fascinating science concepts, humor, suspense, irony, and now and then a burst of shocking violence. Underneath all the details, it’s a very simple story about a high-stakes engineering problem.

Book Review: “Werewolves: A Hunter’s Guide” by Graeme Davis
Book Reviews / February 2, 2018

In this well-researched, lavishly illustrated and clearly organized book, Graeme Davis lays out a fairly convincing outline of the different types of werewolf, how to spot them, how dangerous they are, and what to do about them. Then he goes on to discuss werewolf society and the societies that hunt werewolves.

Book Review: “The League of Unexceptional Children” by Gitty Daneshvari
Book Reviews / January 31, 2018

These kids’ spy adventure is just as ludicrous as you would expect, and the danger level never feels really high. But what the story lacks in hard-hitting action and wire-taut tension, it makes up in tummy-tickling comedy. From its general concept to its tiniest detail, this book is just a hairsbreadth too lovable to qualify as tickle-torture.

Book Review: “The Siren and the Sword” by Celia Tan
Book Reviews / January 29, 2018

In an afterword to this book, Tan admits she was inspired by Harry Potter. At its weaker moments, it reads like a piece of erotic fanfiction, with the difference that the characters are original and the setting is Veritas, a hidden college of magic within Harvard University.

Book Review: “Felicity the Dragon” by Ruthie Briggs-Greenberg
Book Reviews / January 27, 2018

In a few rhyming lines, decorated with adorable paintings, Felicity the Dragon tells the story of a lonely dragon who doesn’t fit in with her kind. One day, while watching some children play alongside a castle moat, she sees a boy fall into the water and dives to save him. This act of kindness brings Felicity her first taste of friendship and feelings of belonging.

Book Review: “The Woodcutter” by Kate Danley
Book Reviews / January 25, 2018

This book is a deadly serious, grown-up take on the land of stories that never for an instant winks at the reader or acknowledges a real world outside its own Grimm reality. It reveals some of the nastier things usually hidden on the underside of folklore.

Book Review: “Johnny and the Dead” by Terry Pratchett
Book Reviews / January 23, 2018

Of all the people in Blackbury, UK, who could have suddenly developed the ability to see ghosts, it would just have to be Johnny Maxwell. He isn’t strong, clever, good-looking, or full of personality. Yet the weird stuff always happens to him. And what makes him weird is that he’s always open to it.

Book Review: “Only You Can Save Mankind” by Terry Pratchett
Book Reviews / January 21, 2018

Only You Can Save Mankind is the title of the latest computer game pirated by Johnny’s fat hacker pal Wobbler. It’s only a step or so beyond Space Invaders (remember? anybody?), in which the player has to blow up alien spaceships from one-seater fighters to the huge mothership. Johnny is doing quite well at it until, just before he fires the kill-shot at the alien mothership, a message comes on his screen: WE WANT TO TALK.