Book Review: The Mirror’s Tale by P.W. Catanese
Book Reviews / September 18, 2005

The fourth “Further Tales” adventure picks up the classic tale of Snow White over a century later. Among the lovely heroine’s descendants are twin brothers Bertram and William – one of them (no one is sure which) destined to become a baron someday – always in trouble, one leading and the other following – and finally, too much trouble for their parents to deal with any longer. Bert is packed off to an unfriendly uncle’s gloomy castle on the borders of the feared and hated Dwergh. Will is given lessons in warfare and personal combat. And a forgotten evil that turns love into hatred, that poisons minds and destroys lives, awakens.

Book Review: The Eye of the Warlock by P. W. Catanese
Book Reviews / September 18, 2005

When Paul Catanese e-mailed me in response to my reviews of his first two “Further Tales,” I was flabbergasted. To be sure, it wasn’t the first time I had heard from an author whose books I reviewed. Nor was it the first time I was offered a sneak peek at a book that was about to be published. But it was the first time that both things happened together, making Book Trolley history and my year! I have reviewed many books, and I have previewed a couple, but this is the first time that I was offered a chance to preview a book I was planning to read! Thanks, Paul!

Book Review: The Hounds of the Mórrígan by Pat O’’Shea
Book Reviews / September 18, 2005

The Book Trolley is all about the question, “What would be the perfect book to turn to after reading Harry Potter?” Answering that question becomes more and more complex as the Harry Potter series develops. Jenny Nimmo’s Children of the Red King series, for instance, is one possible answer – if you’re looking for something on the level of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s/Sorcerer’s Stone. This book by Pat O’’Shea, on the other hand, is the nearest thing to Order of the Phoenix, at least in size.

Book Review: A Hat Full of Sky by Terry Pratchett
Book Reviews / September 2, 2005

This sequel to The Wee Free Men continues the adventures of Tiffany Aching, the young witch of Discworld’s chalk downs, and her determined escort of tiny, red-headed, blue men who love fighting, stealing, and the drink: the Nac Mac Feegle, also known as Pictsies.

Book Review: Charlie Bone and the Castle of Mirrors (Children of the Red King, Book Four) by Jenny Nimmo
Book Reviews / September 2, 2005

As he begins his second year at Bloor’s Academy, Charlie finds himself floundering with confusion – like a first-year all over again! One of the reasons is that Manfred Bloor, late head boy, is back as a teaching assistant, and his equally nasty stooge, Asa Pike, has also returned (to repeat a year). Another reason has to do with the delicate balance among the handful of magically endowed students at Bloor’s, which has begun to tilt toward the Dark Side – thanks to a strange, magnetic little boy named Joshua Tilpin.

Book Review: Charlie Bone and the Time Twister (Children of the Red King Book Two) by Jenny Nimmo
Book Reviews / September 2, 2005

In his second term at Bloor’s Academy, Charlie continues to develop his gift for finding trouble (and leading other kids – even older ones – into it as well). He also, by the way, develops his gift for talking with people in pictures. Unlike Harry Potter’s world, being able to chat with people in paintings isn’t a common magical gift! And unlike Hogwarts, Bloor’s isn’t a warm, safe place where a child can foil a Dark Lord in between lessons and games. This is a school whose grounds contain dangerous ruins; run by wicked people who could do serious harm to Charlie and his friends; with a head boy of incredible nastiness; a 100-year-old dark sorcerer scheming in a tower room; an eight-year-old albino spy; and really a small number of magical children in proportion to the student body – and roughly half of them are evil!

Book Review: Midnight for Charlie Bone (Children of the Red King, Book One) by Jenny Nimmo
Book Reviews / September 2, 2005

This popular series, which, as of this writing, runs four books strong, should appeal very strongly to Harry Potter fans. Its hero is a messy-haired little boy who never knew his father and who discovers at age 10 or 11 that he has a magical gift. As a result, Charlie is enrolled at a school where other “endowed” children study, eating at house tables below the staff at their head table, and sleeping in draughty dormitories. The school crawls with secrets, and the forces of good and evil are constantly clashing, constantly striving for control of the magic – especially, it seems, of Charlie’s magic. For it doesn’’t take long to realize that Charlie has a “saving people thing”—gee, why does this sound familiar?

Book Review: Red Unicorn by Tanith Lee
Book Reviews / September 2, 2005

The third book in the series that begins with Black Unicorn and Gold Unicorn begins with a refreshing summary of the first two books. Then, it plunges quickly into a new tale featuring the young sorceress Tanaquil and her talking pet peeve.

Book Review: Black Water (Pendragon Book Five) by D.J. MacHale
Book Reviews / August 30, 2005

As the Pendragon series continues, the battle of Bobby Pendragon and his fellow Travelers against the time-and-space-hopping demon, Saint Dane, grows more and more intense. I hope I’m not going to ruin The Reality Bug for you right now but…well, there’s something about knowing that Bobby Pendragon can lose, and Saint Dane can win, that “ups the ante” on the suspense. Not only does Bobby’s imperfect record of wins vs. losses mean that anything can happen, but now, in Saint Dane’s words, “the rules have changed” – most likely to Saint Dane’s advantage!