Book Review: “Orangeboy” by Patrice Lawrence
Book Reviews / July 12, 2016

Thrilling, dangerous, compelling, mysterious, and intriguing – delve into the curious question of “Orangeboy” for a fast and furious contemporary read. The debut YA novel from author Patrice Lawrence, “Orangeboy” is an action-packed story that hurtles along the streets of London, and your heart will still be pounding after the final page. It is the journey of one young boy’s desperate attempts to outrun the past and a society whose expectations are stacked against him.

Book Review: “Life is Funny” by E.R. Frank
Book Reviews / July 11, 2016

“Life is Funny” traces the lives of 11 teenagers in one Brooklyn neighborhood over the course of seven years. This ambitious undertaking depicts teens dealing with real-life issues, like self-harm, abuse, family expectations, friendship, and falling in love.

Book Review: “Love Blind” by C. Desir and Jolene Perry
Book Reviews / July 9, 2016

“Love Blind” alternates chapters between protagonists Hailey, a teenage rocker who has the eyes of a 90-year-old (according to her doctor), and Kyle, an extremely shy boy who works the sound board at his high school’s radio station and has a troubled home life. Hailey recruits him to tackle a “fear list” with her – a list where each of them write down their greatest fears and face them, one by one.

Book Review: “Run” by Kody Keplinger
Book Reviews / July 8, 2016

Bo Dickinson and Agnes Atwood don’t seem like they should be best friends – Agnes is the church-going blind girl, and Bo is the latest in the line of no-good Dickinsons, pariahs of the town. Maybe it’s the fact that neither of them has ever really found true friendship that draws them together, but whatever it is, neither of their lives is ever going to be the same again.

Book Review: “Everland” by Wendy Spinale
Book Reviews / July 8, 2016

In this alternate “Peter Pan” retelling, Everland is a post-invasion Steampunk London where almost all of the adults have died of a mysterious contagion, leaving children to fend for themselves against German invader Captain Hanz Otto Oswald Kretschmer – Captain Hook.

Book Review: “Roses and Rot” by Kat Howard
Book Reviews / June 20, 2016

Imogen, a writer, and her sister Marin, a dancer, are ecstatic when they find that they’ve both been accepted for prestigious nine-month fellowships at Melete, a renowned artists’ retreat. Although now both adults with budding careers, they still live in the shadow of an emotionally (and sometimes physically) abusive childhood instigated by their manipulative mother. This retreat is their chance not only to better their art, but to really get to know each other as sisters again. Soon, however, they’ll find that not everything at Melete is as perfect as it appears.

Book Review: “Outrun the Moon” by Stacey Lee
Book Reviews / May 24, 2016

Mercy Wong has big dreams, hoping to become a successful businesswoman who earns enough to move her family out of their tight Chinatown quarters. In the San Francisco of 1906, this dream seems near enough to impossible, but Mercy’s resourcefulness earns her a place at St. Clare’s Boarding School, one of the most respected girls’ schools in the country.

Book Review: “Children of Earth and Sky” by Guy Gavriel Kay
Book Reviews / May 11, 2016

Guy Gavriel Kay may be known to many as a fantasy author, but his new novel, “Children of Earth and Sky”, is more an alternate Renaissance history than anything else. There’s just the barest whiff of magic thrown in there, but even without it, Kay has created a rich and absorbing epic that you can really get lost in.