Book Reviews

Book Review: Rot & Ruin by Jonathan Maberry

RotRuin

Though I have never read a book by Jonathan Maberry before, this one came home with me in the middle of a pile of library books. And there it stayed until I had renewed it so many times that I had to take it back to the library and check it out again. I have never really taken much interest in Zombie Apocalypse literature. But something about this book appealed to me to that extent. ... Read More »

Book Review: Right Ho, Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse

RightHo

The Jeeves novels are one of the few series of books I have chosen to enjoy without any regard to canon order or the order of publication. Wikipedia has a nice list of the books it comprises, if you’re interested. I’m interested, but only so far as making sure that I don’t miss any of them. Nothing brightens my outlook on the world after a nutritious diet of serious books on CD, quite like listening ... Read More »

Book Review: Odd Apocalypse by Dean Koontz

OddApocalypse

In the sixth Odd Thomas novel, a young fry cook who sees dead people continues his sabbatical from the spatula and grill. As in his previous two adventures, he finds trouble brewing in a misnamed California coastal town. In Odd Hours it was Magic Beach, where practically everything in town is named contrary to its nature, where premonitions of nuclear disaster forced him into the role of avenging angel, and where he was joined in ... Read More »

Interview with JR Han

teen reading

According to some studies, reading rates among young people is down. However, publisher JR Han plans to engage kids with a new series of books combining Asian mythology and the modern form of the graphic novel. I interviewed JR to find out more about his graphic novels. Why is it valuable/important for teens to read? Comics are a new format invented in 20th century. Comic books are beloved by most generations thanks to the artistic ... Read More »

Book Review: “The Silkworm” by Robert Galbraith

The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith

After months of waiting, we've finally got the official MuggleNet review of "The Silkworm"! Read our thoughts, and then let us know your own! Read More »

Book Review: Turbulence by Samit Basu

Turbulence

What if, instead of all-American journalist Clark Kent, Superman turns out to be an Indian Air Force pilot named Vir Singh? What if his archnemesis also happens to be his commanding officer? What’s in store for the world when passengers on a flight from London to Delhi suddenly start to present super powers? One of those passengers, a nerdy guy named Aman, has thoroughly studied the prophetic texts on this subject—namely, comic books—but he isn’t ... Read More »

Book Review: Cosmic by Frank Cottrell Boyce

Cosmic

Two twelve-year-olds from Waterloo, U.K. (near Liverpool) tell their parents they are going to the Lake District for a school camp, when in fact they are going to the moon. Kids these days! It’s only the latest prank pulled by young Liam, who has made a study of ways to get in trouble by being tall for his age and stubbly-chinned. When adults mistake him for one of them because of his height and mature ... Read More »

Book Review: The Book of the Sword by A. J. Lake

BookSword

Edmund is a prince with the power to see through the eyes of other people and animals, to communicate mind-to-mind. Elspeth is a sailor’s daughter who has formed an intimate bond with a magic sword. Together, they are either mankind’s only hope to defeat the evil god Loki, or Loki’s only hope to defeat mankind. Welcome to Book 2 of the Darkest Age trilogy! This middle book begins where the first left off, with Edmund ... Read More »

Book Review: Scumble by Ingrid Law

Scumble

In her debut novel Savvy, Ingrid Law introduced us to the big, unconventional Beaumont family, in which each child manifests a unique super-power (called a “savvy”) on his or her thirteenth birthday. The challenge is to recognize what that savvy is and scumble it, or figure out how to control it, before something big happens. Otherwise people could get hurt; or, even worse, outsiders might find out about the family’s secret. In this sequel, we ... Read More »

Book Review: Timeless by Gail Carriger

Timeless

The fifth and final book of “The Parasol Protectorate” confronts Lady Alexia Maccon, née Tarabotti, and her team of supernatural sleuths, with a mystery that reaches back into ancient Egypt. Intertwined with this mystery are a present-day murder case, a dark secret that threatens to break up the pack of werewolves led by Alexia’s Alpha husband, and the lingering puzzle of the father she never knew. And so a racy, funny series of romantic whodunits, ... Read More »