Book Review: “Only You Can Save Mankind” by Terry Pratchett
Book Reviews / January 21, 2018

Only You Can Save Mankind is the title of the latest computer game pirated by Johnny’s fat hacker pal Wobbler. It’s only a step or so beyond Space Invaders (remember? anybody?), in which the player has to blow up alien spaceships from one-seater fighters to the huge mothership. Johnny is doing quite well at it until, just before he fires the kill-shot at the alien mothership, a message comes on his screen: WE WANT TO TALK.

Book Review: “Rapacia: The Second Circle of Heck” by Dale E. Basye
Book Reviews / January 17, 2018

Marlo has matriculated to the Second Circle of Heck, where kids study such subjects as necroeconomics while being tormented by desire for material possessions. Egged on by Rapacia’s Vice Principal of Darkness – a giant tin Easter bunny named the Grabbit, whose hollow voice speaks in diabolically cute limericks – Marlo begins to plan the heist of all eternity.

Book Review: “Doughnut” by Tom Holt
Book Reviews / January 13, 2018

From a grand design that challenges you to reconsider the order of cause and effect, to sentences like “If Time is a piece of cheese, the two seconds that followed were fondue,” this book makes you think, then laugh, then grip your armrests with concern and excitement, over and over until its cleverly satisfying ending.

Book Review: “Every Seventh Wave” by Daniel Glattauer
Book Reviews / January 13, 2018

It all started innocently: an email sent to the wrong address, an “I” before an “E” where it shouldn’t have been. What followed was a friendship, then romance of sorts. This is the follow-up book to “Love Virtually”, in which Emmi Rothner mistakenly emails Leo Leike and things take off from there.

Book Review: “The Martian” by Andy Weir
Book Reviews / January 9, 2018

This might turn out to be a historically important book, lending insights to the development of manned Mars exploration. But for now it’s notable enough for what it is: a smart, exciting piece of entertainment that touches the heart and transports the mind to a strange but real world.