Book Reviews

Book Review: The Book of the Sword by A. J. Lake

BookSword

Edmund is a prince with the power to see through the eyes of other people and animals, to communicate mind-to-mind. Elspeth is a sailor’s daughter who has formed an intimate bond with a magic sword. Together, they are either mankind’s only hope to defeat the evil god Loki, or Loki’s only hope to defeat mankind. Welcome to Book 2 of the Darkest Age trilogy! This middle book begins where the first left off, with Edmund ... Read More »

Book Review: Scumble by Ingrid Law

Scumble

In her debut novel Savvy, Ingrid Law introduced us to the big, unconventional Beaumont family, in which each child manifests a unique super-power (called a “savvy”) on his or her thirteenth birthday. The challenge is to recognize what that savvy is and scumble it, or figure out how to control it, before something big happens. Otherwise people could get hurt; or, even worse, outsiders might find out about the family’s secret. In this sequel, we ... Read More »

Book Review: Timeless by Gail Carriger

Timeless

The fifth and final book of “The Parasol Protectorate” confronts Lady Alexia Maccon, née Tarabotti, and her team of supernatural sleuths, with a mystery that reaches back into ancient Egypt. Intertwined with this mystery are a present-day murder case, a dark secret that threatens to break up the pack of werewolves led by Alexia’s Alpha husband, and the lingering puzzle of the father she never knew. And so a racy, funny series of romantic whodunits, ... Read More »

Book Review: “Rogues,” the new anthology from George R. R. Martin!

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George R.R. Martin! Neil Gaiman! Patrick Rothfuss! Check out our review of "Rogues," a new star-studded short story anthology that's out today! Read More »

Book Review: All the Rage by F. Paul Wilson

AlltheRage

In the fourth Repairman Jack novel, the rakoshi are back. Those were the blue-skinned, yellow-eyed, man-eating demons from Indian prehistory, who terrorized Jack and his loved ones in The Tomb. Now the last rakosh—the one who left his claw-marks on Jack’s chest—has turned up in a freak show at the same quaint Long Island town where Jack battled the otherness in Conspiracies. Jack is torn between killing it, to make sure it can never hurt ... Read More »

Book Review: Honor & Innocence by Glen Thomas Hierlmeier

Honor & Innocence

Honor & Innocence Against the Tides of War by Glen Thomas Hierlmeier If the History Channel were to make an original movie based on the events of World War II à la Pearl Harbor, you’d have Glen Thomas Hierlmeier’s Honor & Innocence Against the Tides of War. The novel follows Hank, a young American soldier tasked with taking a group of German interns back to Germany shortly in the summer of 1945. Although unhappy to ... Read More »

Book Review: Geek Fantasy Novel by E. Archer

Geek

Ralph is a geek, but not the type who would ordinarily dream of becoming the hero in a fantasy novel. In fact, Ralph’s boring parents have done their best to instill in him a flat, unheroic, unimaginative character. Their reason is that it is dangerous for members of their family to make wishes. The closest thing to a wish that has ever crossed Ralph’s mind is his dream of being a computer game designer. I ... Read More »

Book Review: Heartless by Gail Carriger

Heartless

It’s the fourth book of The Parasol Protectorate, and only the first time that phrase is mentioned in the series. Also known as Alexia Tarabotti novels (though she’s been Lady Maccon since her marriage), they relate the racy, dangerous adventures of a soulless, or preternatural, lady in a steampunk version of Victorian England. Being preternatural means she can turn vampires and werewolves mortal with a touch; she can even exorcise ghosts. Being the wife of ... Read More »

Book Review: Odd Interlude by Dean Koontz

OddInterlude

This book bills itself as “A Special Odd Thomas Adventure.” Its main character describes it as a “detour from the main arc of my journey.” In this list of the works of Dean Koontz, extremely prolific horror maven that he is, it is listed separately from the canonical series of (so far) seven Odd Thomas novels. And before being published in a single paperback volume, it was originally rolled out as a three-part series of ... Read More »

Book Review: The Serpent’s Shadow by Rick Riordan

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The third and (for now) final book in The Kane Chronicles begins with an apology “for any inconvenience the end of the world may have caused you.” As the story unfolds, narrated alternately by siblings Carter and Sadie Kane, you’ll become increasingly inclined to accept their apology. Some catastrophes are really hard to prevent. And though the young Kanes often feel responsible even for things that are out of their control, they are finally ready ... Read More »