Today, the next installment of the "Order of the MoonStone" series released!

Imogen, a writer, and her sister Marin, a dancer, are ecstatic when they find that they’ve both been accepted for prestigious nine-month fellowships at Melete, a renowned artists’ retreat. Although now both adults with budding careers, they still live in the shadow of an emotionally (and sometimes physically) abusive childhood instigated by their manipulative mother. This retreat is their chance not only to better their art, but to really get ...

Mercy Wong has big dreams, hoping to become a successful businesswoman who earns enough to move her family out of their tight Chinatown quarters. In the San Francisco of 1906, this dream seems near enough to impossible, but Mercy’s resourcefulness earns her a place at St. Clare’s Boarding School, one of the most respected girls’ schools in the country.

Guy Gavriel Kay may be known to many as a fantasy author, but his new novel, "Children of Earth and Sky", is more an alternate Renaissance history than anything else. There’s just the barest whiff of magic thrown in there, but even without it, Kay has created a rich and absorbing epic that you can really get lost in.

"The Countdown" is the final book in the "Taking" trilogy.

It’s been a long year to wait for the second installment in Gwenda Bond’s YA series chronicling the teenage adventures of Lois Lane, ace reporter and Superman love interest, but we’re happy to report that "Lois Lane: Double Down" is finally here!

"Me Before You" by Jojo Moyes is the story of 35-year-old Will, who, having suffered a severe motorcycle accident several months previously, requires 24-hour care, and Lou, a 26-year-old woman who has never left the safe haven of her small town. When Lou gets made redundant at her job in a cake shop, she tries and fails at several career routes before stumbling across the position of Will’s carer.

The conclusion to Maggie Stiefvater’s "Raven Cycle" has got to be one of the most anticipated YA book releases of the season. Although many fans were disappointed when the release of the book was pushed back a few months, I think you’re going to find that the delay was worth the wait!

After losing her mother in a tragic car accident, Sass finds herself being shipped to Cornwall, England to live with an uncle she’s never met. The English seaside is beautiful, but it can’t heal the hole she feels inside of her. Alex is British royalty, fleeing to his ancestral home by the sea to try to escape the paparazzi swirling around him in the wake of his parents’ divorce. When he runs across Sass trespassing on family land, captivated ...

"Chasing Water: Elegy of an Olympian" is a memoir tracing both the troubles and accomplishments of Olympic swimmer Anthony Ervin, from his breakout performance at the 2000 Sydney Games to his bad-boy image and eventual reappearance at the London Games in 2012.

Book Review: The Princess and Curdie by George MacDonald
Book Reviews / June 22, 2005

The sequel to The Princess and the Goblin begins with a taste of the sort of disappointment that, in real-life stories, often follows the “happily ever after” ending. Curdie, the miner’s son, no longer has the Princess Irene to protect or the goblins and their bizarre creatures to fight against. He doesn'’t whistle or sing any more, he no longer spends much time looking at beautiful animals and plants, he is not such a good son to hi...

Book Review: The Golden Key by George MacDonald
Book Reviews / June 22, 2005

A boy named Mossy hears tell of a golden key that can be found at the end of the rainbow. One evening at sunset, he crosses into fairyland and finds that key—only to become involved in a much longer quest, to find the lock that it opens. A girl named Tangle runs away from her sad home and is adopted by a fairy grandmother, who is served by feathered fish that swim through the air. Years pass in moments, characters age backwards and f...

Book Review: H.M.S. Surprise by Patrick O’Brian
Book Reviews / June 16, 2005

I am occasionally criticized for focusing my readings (and writings) too narrowly, and not posting enough reviews of adult novels. Well, here’s an adult novel for you, definitely. There is so much historical research behind these books, they should be required reading for history majors. Like a veritable Sybill Trelawney, O’Brian “channels” the style of speaking, the political situation, the social attitudes, and the intricate detail...

Book Review: Post Captain by Patrick O’Brian
Book Reviews / June 3, 2005

This is the second book in the series that began with Master and Commander. It continues to follow the, at times, strained friendship between a brash young Royal Navy officer named Jack Aubrey and the physician, ship’s surgeon, naturalist, and sometime spy named Stephen Maturin

Book Review: The Wonderful Adventures of Nils by Selma Lagerlöf
Book Reviews / May 27, 2005

In 1909, Selma Lagerlöf became the first woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature. Three years earlier, she wrote this delicious book that weaves true lessons of the history, geography, and wildlife of Sweden into folk tale or fairy tale episodes. It is sometimes exciting, suspenseful, and scary. Other times it is witty or silly. And now and then, it is so wistful and even tragic that it will fill your eyes with tears. This book h...

Book Review: Master and Commander by Patrick O’Brian
Book Reviews / May 27, 2005

You may have seen the very excellent film Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, a curiously titled film, so named because it is loosely based on two different books by the same author. Patrick O’Brian’s long series of naval novels about a British captain in the Napoleonic Wars begins with this book; the one called The Far Side of the World was the tenth of twenty books, all of them centering on the exploits of Captain Jack...

Book Review: The Callender Papers by Cynthia Voigt
Book Reviews / May 20, 2005

This “gothic novel for young readers” won the Edgar Allan Poe award and comes from the Newbery-medal-winning author of Dicey’s Song. Set in the late 1800’s, it is the tale of a thirteen-year-old girl, raised by a schoolmistress “Aunt” (who actually isn’t a blood relative) who is hired to spend the summer sorting out the family papers of a cold and forbidding widower named Mr. Thiel at his secluded mansion in the New England countryside.

Book Review: Wild Magic by Tamora Pierce
Book Reviews / May 20, 2005

All right, I’ve finally done it. After 4,322,845 e-mails begging, bribing, threatening, and demanding that I read something by Tamora Pierce and review it for the Book Trolley, I finally took the hint. Now PLEASE don’t say I never listened to you! And pleeeease believe me when I say that I WILL read more books by Tamora Pierce and review them in due time. So please be patient!