Our May Author Takeover is by Cat Clarke, whose latest YA novel, "Girlhood", is a darkly compulsive story about love, death, and growing up under the shadow of grief. Set in a boarding school in Scotland, the familiar halls are the perfect place for "Potter" fans to escape to in this compulsive, addictive read. Yet there are some sinister secrets that threaten to tear friendships apart.

Our April Author Takeover features Aliette de Bodard talking about something the "Potter" fandom knows all about: warring Houses. Join Aliette as she discusses her own House wars and the continuation of the beautiful "Dominion of the Fallen" series.

Our new Author Takeover comes from New York Times–bestselling author of "The Lunar Chronicles" Marissa Meyer, with her new novel, "Heartless". The "Potter" fandom knows all about characters with a predetermined fate, and we're well used to the idea of the Chosen One. In Marissa's "Heartless", we have a vision of Wonderland like none you've seen before.

When Mary Adams sees Millais’ depiction of the tragic Ophelia, a whole new world opens up for her. Determined to find out more about the beautiful girl in the painting, she hears the story of Lizzie Siddal – a girl from a modest background, not unlike her own, who has found fame and fortune against the odds. Mary sets out to become a Pre-Raphaelite muse, too, and reinvents herself as Persephone Lavelle.

The first of our March Author Takeovers comes from Gemma Fowler. Her new novel, "Moonlight", is an edge-of-your-seat sci-fi thriller with a contemporary voice. Gemma would be pleased as punch to find herself on the highest tower of Hogwarts. Her soul is still and always will be 13 years old, and her characters embrace teenage rebellion and refusal to blindly comply with authority, much like our Golden Trio.

Our final February Author Takeover comes from Lisa Williamson, whose second novel, "All About Mia", is out now from David Fickling Books. In this standalone after her first book, "The Art of Being Normal", Lisa now turns to look at family dynamics and the structure of sibling personality types.

Just imagine: what would your year look like if you read only marginalized authors? What would the world look like if we all did the same? And how many books do you read each year, anyway? If it’s more than 30, I challenge you to pick up every one of these. I know you can do it!

Today, our Author Takeover is by Sharon Gosling, whose Scandi Noir YA horror novel, FIR, is out now as part of the RED EYE series from Stripes Books. Set in the middle of an isolated ancient forest in Sweden, FIR has a menacing and claustrophobic atmosphere that haunts the misadventures of a family stranded, surrounded by the might and magic of trees.

To celebrate book lovers everywhere, this month we have a series of Author Takeovers. The first comes from the hilarious Maz Evans, whose book, "Who Let The Gods Out?", is a new, exciting, and brilliantly British, Percy Jackson-esque adventure – the first in a series centered on the Olympian gods.

This month's Author Takeover comes from Alwyn Hamilton discussing the trials and tribulations of writing a second book. The characters from her first book, Rebel of the Sands, return with Traitor to the Throne. We have three copies up for grabs for readers in UK & Ireland, find out more below!

Book Review: Dragon’s Blood by Jane Yolen
Book Reviews / November 17, 2004

This is the first novel in the Pit Dragon Trilogy that continues with Heart's Blood. The author has also written a Young Merlin Trilogy and a Tartan Magic trilogy, as well as a Starscape book entitled Briar Rose.

Book Review: Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
Book Reviews / November 17, 2004

Ms. Levine's first children's novel is this 1997 Newbery Honor Book, which has recently been made into a movie. (Robbie's note: Whoops. Don't go to see the movie after all. It really stinks.) And in a way, it's nothing new. It's another version of the classic Cinderella tale, which has been made into countless movies (like Ever After), books (like Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister) and even operas (La Cenerentola by Rossini). Bu…

Book Review: The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley
Book Reviews / November 17, 2004

Though this book won the 1985 Newbery Medal for excellence in children's literature, it is a rather grown-up book. I suppose that proves that a book doesn't have to be about children, or even necessarily written for children, to be enjoyed by young readers.

Book Review: The Cockatrice Boys by Joan Aiken
Book Reviews / November 10, 2004

From the Wolves series, featuring Dido Twite, I had already come to regard Joan Aiken as a wonderful writer with a flair for colloquial British speech, humor, adventure, and the clash of titanic forces of good and evil. From Diana Wynne Jones' Deep Secret I had come to regard the Starscape series (penned by a variety of authors) as being possibly the best-kept secret in young-adult fiction. Both of these impressions are confirme…

Book Review: The Holy Bible by miscellaneous authors
Book Reviews / November 9, 2004

There are several good reasons not to include a review of "the Good Book" on the Book Trolley. First, MuggleNet does not sponsor any particular religion, and my views about the Bible are not necessarily the views of MuggleNet, its webmaster, its editors, or its devoted readers. I'm sure they have no intention of letting this site be used for religious propaganda. Second, it might seem beneath the dignity of the Bible, to those o…

Book Review: Sour Land by William H. Armstrong
Book Reviews / October 20, 2004

This is a companion book to Sounder, and in my opinion, an even more moving book. Perhaps its power lies in its personal, intimate nature. Unlike Sounder, this book is full of characters with lifelike names. It does not come across as a universal parable—though it may be that—but as a portrait of a handful of very specific, individual people. People who are bound together by loss and by love, by hard work and the enjoyment of st…

Book Review: Sounder by William H. Armstrong
Book Reviews / October 20, 2004

This is a still, gentle story about loss, waiting, and searching, set in the Southern U. S. around the turn of the 20th century. It mostly concerns a family circle--particularly the mother, father, and oldest boy--and their coon dog, Sounder. Touched by tragedy and racial injustice, it puts a high value on hope, on the love of nature, and on the love of words.

Book Review: Peter Pan and Wendy by J. M. Barrie
Book Reviews / October 20, 2004

Written in 1906 to benefit a London children's hospital, this classic has gone through such a wringer of stage, film, and animated adaptations, not to mention picture-book retellings, that reading or hearing the original text is now somewhat unusual; but not nearly as unusual as the story itself, which is by turns witty and bizarre and melancholy and gruesome, and always narrated in a uniquely teasing way.