We are joined by debut author Sophie Cameron to celebrate her wonderful new young adult novel Out of the Blue. Set against the backdrop of the frenzied Edinburgh Festival, Out of the Blue is the story of grief, love, and learning to live on. Supported by a group of new friends, Sophie's main character, Jaya, finds her feet, even when angels are falling from the sky.

Our March Author Takeover comes from Akemi Dawn Bowman, author of "Starfish", which is publishing in the UK next month. Her stunning debut novel examines social anxiety, toxic relationships, rejection, and the importance of being true to yourself. Today Akemi looks at the similarities between Harry and her main character, Kiko, and the paths they tread.

In our first Author Takeover of 2018, we are joined by the New York Times–bestselling author of How to Hang a Witch, Adriana Mather. A spellbinding story of witchcraft, ghosts, and a destructive age-old curse, How to Hang a Witch was partially inspired by Adriana's own family history.

This month's Author Takeover comes from a "Harry Potter" superfan, author Annabel Pitcher. Her new teen novella, "The Last Days of Archie Maxwell", explores the aftermath of secrets revealed. Published by dyslexia-friendly publisher Barrington Stoke, Archie's story is a heartfelt and accessible story exploring the boundaries of love – particularly upon realizing a parental figure may not be all that they seem.

Mostly cast as the villain, often without rhyme or reason as to why, witches have always seemed so mysterious. They are the opposite of damsels in distress, Sleeping Beautys, Cinderellas, Snow Whites. They are mistresses of their own fortunes. They have the power to change lives – their own and others’. They have magic.

Our Author Takeover this month is dedicated to everyone headed to university/college this autumn/fall! It comes from Brit authors Lucy and Tom, whose novel "Freshers" is all about that first transitional year. In particular, the benefits of fandom and clubs for finding your people.

Our Author Takeover for July comes from Aisha Bushby, a debut author and Potterhead whose short story "Marionette Girl" is published next month in "A Change Is Gonna Come" from Stripes. #ChangeBook is an anthology of stories and poetry from BAME writers on the theme of change.

Our May Author Takeover is by Cat Clarke, whose latest YA novel, "Girlhood", is a darkly compulsive story about love, death, and growing up under the shadow of grief. Set in a boarding school in Scotland, the familiar halls are the perfect place for "Potter" fans to escape to in this compulsive, addictive read. Yet there are some sinister secrets that threaten to tear friendships apart.

Our April Author Takeover features Aliette de Bodard talking about something the "Potter" fandom knows all about: warring Houses. Join Aliette as she discusses her own House wars and the continuation of the beautiful "Dominion of the Fallen" series.

Our new Author Takeover comes from New York Times–bestselling author of "The Lunar Chronicles" Marissa Meyer, with her new novel, "Heartless". The "Potter" fandom knows all about characters with a predetermined fate, and we're well used to the idea of the Chosen One. In Marissa's "Heartless", we have a vision of Wonderland like none you've seen before.

Book Review: Tom’s Midnight Garden by Philippa Pearce
Book Reviews / January 8, 2006

This book first came out in 1958, which is important to know if you're going to follow the time-line of the story. It's about a then-present-day boy named Tom Long, who is miserable about being exiled to his boring aunt and uncle's flat for the summer, instead of being able to romp around the backyard with his beloved brother Peter. The reason is Peter has the measles, so if Tom doesn't have them he has to be kept away from Pete…

Book Review: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Book Reviews / January 8, 2006

Naturally, I have to recommend that you see the award-winning, classic film based on this book, starring the late Gregory Peck. As a movie buff it would go against my principles not to. But I also, wholeheartedly, recommend reading the 1960 novel by Harper Lee. It is an incredibly moving experience.

Book Review: The Borrowers by Mary Norton
Book Reviews / January 8, 2006

Mary Norton's original book begins with a little girl who spends time every afternoon working on a quilt with a very old widow who boards in her parents' house. The girl complains about how a crocheting needle disappeared off a bottom shelf overnight, and the old lady (Mrs. May) wonders whether this house has borrowers too. The girl becomes curious, so the old lady tells her a story that her little brother told her many years ago.

Book Review: The Dragon of Never-Was by Ann Downer
Book Reviews / December 18, 2005

Further to Hatching Magic, this book reunites a young wyvern (try to picture a catlike dragon) with a similarly young wizard. Vyrna (the wyvern) and Theodora (the wizard) have been separated by an ocean since the Events of Last Summer - when they put a stop to the plans of an evil wizard that involved time travel, demon possession, and the summoning of a Chinese dragon in the middle of present-day Boston, USA - but one gathers t…

Book Review: The Somebodies by N.E. Bode
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

It has already been two books since Fern and Howard, switched at birth, have been switched back - but they remain "sort of" sister and brother, and grow more so as their third adventure progresses. It begins in school, where they are expelled after Fern turns her atrocious teacher's hair into a live (but tiny) pony. Howard's real parents, the Drudgers, step in with a court order to send both kids to a military school. So, in des…

Book Review: The Nobodies by N.E. Bode
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

In this sequel to The Anybodies, Fern is eager to go to Camp Happy Sunshine Good Times, where she will be surrounded by other “anybody” children; that is, children who can hypnotize people and objects, shake things out of books, and shape-change. She wants to learn more about how to use her powers, and make friends with other kids like her. She also wants to spend time with her almost-sort-of-as-it-were brother George, who was s…

Book Review: The Anybodies by N.E. Bode
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

For a quick-reference guide to some of the best children’s fantasy books, there’s no better place to go than a children’s fantasy book about children’s fantasy books. A recent, famous example is the Inkheart series by Cornelia Funke. Another example is this book, whose elusive author owes a lot to adult fiction writer Julianna Baggott.

Book Review: Once Upon A Curse by E. D. Baker
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

Princess Emma is in love with a prince who wants to marry her. She is also the Green Witch, the most powerful witch in the kingdom. Her range of friends includes a talking dog, a bat named Li’l, and some dragons; and she even enjoys the company of a ghostly grandfather.

Book Review: Dragon’s Breath by E. D. Baker
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

Emma is a princess, but she doesn’t act like one. At least, that’s what her mother says. Clumsy, tomboyish, and lacking certain social graces, Emma loses even more points by having a talent for magic and an interest in learning it from her Aunt Grassina, the “Green Witch” whose magic protects the kingdom. Plus, her chances of marrying a respectable prince will sink even lower when word gets around that she spent several days ALO…