Our second Author Takeover for May is from YA author Alice Oseman, whose incredible third novel, I Was Born For This, was published in the UK earlier this month. An absolute must-read for everyone who has ever been involved in fandom, Alice's novel has a particularly insightful exploration of the light and dark side of shipping, something the Potter fandom knows all about.

Welcome to our Author Takeover for May, with a guest post from Lucy Christopher. Her new YA novel, Storm-Wake, is a modern reimagining of The Tempest. It is a spellbinding tale of transformation and illusion that moves between the realms of dream and reality. Lucy discusses elemental magic and how the stormy island setting lends itself to find magic in the minutiae.

We are joined by debut author Sophie Cameron to celebrate her wonderful new young adult novel Out of the Blue. Set against the backdrop of the frenzied Edinburgh Festival, Out of the Blue is the story of grief, love, and learning to live on. Supported by a group of new friends, Sophie's main character, Jaya, finds her feet, even when angels are falling from the sky.

Our March Author Takeover comes from Akemi Dawn Bowman, author of "Starfish", which is publishing in the UK next month. Her stunning debut novel examines social anxiety, toxic relationships, rejection, and the importance of being true to yourself. Today Akemi looks at the similarities between Harry and her main character, Kiko, and the paths they tread.

In our first Author Takeover of 2018, we are joined by the New York Times–bestselling author of How to Hang a Witch, Adriana Mather. A spellbinding story of witchcraft, ghosts, and a destructive age-old curse, How to Hang a Witch was partially inspired by Adriana's own family history.

This month's Author Takeover comes from a "Harry Potter" superfan, author Annabel Pitcher. Her new teen novella, "The Last Days of Archie Maxwell", explores the aftermath of secrets revealed. Published by dyslexia-friendly publisher Barrington Stoke, Archie's story is a heartfelt and accessible story exploring the boundaries of love – particularly upon realizing a parental figure may not be all that they seem.

Mostly cast as the villain, often without rhyme or reason as to why, witches have always seemed so mysterious. They are the opposite of damsels in distress, Sleeping Beautys, Cinderellas, Snow Whites. They are mistresses of their own fortunes. They have the power to change lives – their own and others’. They have magic.

Our Author Takeover this month is dedicated to everyone headed to university/college this autumn/fall! It comes from Brit authors Lucy and Tom, whose novel "Freshers" is all about that first transitional year. In particular, the benefits of fandom and clubs for finding your people.

Our Author Takeover for July comes from Aisha Bushby, a debut author and Potterhead whose short story "Marionette Girl" is published next month in "A Change Is Gonna Come" from Stripes. #ChangeBook is an anthology of stories and poetry from BAME writers on the theme of change.

Our May Author Takeover is by Cat Clarke, whose latest YA novel, "Girlhood", is a darkly compulsive story about love, death, and growing up under the shadow of grief. Set in a boarding school in Scotland, the familiar halls are the perfect place for "Potter" fans to escape to in this compulsive, addictive read. Yet there are some sinister secrets that threaten to tear friendships apart.

Book Review: The Nobodies by N.E. Bode
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

In this sequel to The Anybodies, Fern is eager to go to Camp Happy Sunshine Good Times, where she will be surrounded by other “anybody” children; that is, children who can hypnotize people and objects, shake things out of books, and shape-change. She wants to learn more about how to use her powers, and make friends with other kids like her. She also wants to spend time with her almost-sort-of-as-it-were brother George, who was s…

Book Review: The Anybodies by N.E. Bode
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

For a quick-reference guide to some of the best children’s fantasy books, there’s no better place to go than a children’s fantasy book about children’s fantasy books. A recent, famous example is the Inkheart series by Cornelia Funke. Another example is this book, whose elusive author owes a lot to adult fiction writer Julianna Baggott.

Book Review: Once Upon A Curse by E. D. Baker
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

Princess Emma is in love with a prince who wants to marry her. She is also the Green Witch, the most powerful witch in the kingdom. Her range of friends includes a talking dog, a bat named Li’l, and some dragons; and she even enjoys the company of a ghostly grandfather.

Book Review: Dragon’s Breath by E. D. Baker
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

Emma is a princess, but she doesn’t act like one. At least, that’s what her mother says. Clumsy, tomboyish, and lacking certain social graces, Emma loses even more points by having a talent for magic and an interest in learning it from her Aunt Grassina, the “Green Witch” whose magic protects the kingdom. Plus, her chances of marrying a respectable prince will sink even lower when word gets around that she spent several days ALO…

Book Review: Juliet Dove, Queen of Love by Bruce Coville
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

I was mistaken when I said that the Magic Shop Books were complete in four books. As recently as 2003, this fifth book came out, once more featuring Mr. Elives and his Magic Supplies shop, as well as Ms. Priest and their “immortal vermin” friends, Jerome and Roxanne, the talking rats.

Book Review: The Wizard of Washington Square by Jane Yolen
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

David and his terrier, D. Dog, have only lived in New York City for a week when they go for a walk in Washington Square Park. David is feeling lonely and bored until he meets Leila, a girl his age who still believes in things like wizards. Grudgingly, David goes along with Leila on an adventure to discover the little, forgetful, second-class wizard who lives under the fountain in Washington Square.

Book Review: The Young Man and the Sea by Rodman Philbrick
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

Samuel “Skiff” Beaman, Jr., is twelve years old and small for his age; but he carries a lot of responsibility. Since his mother died, his father doesn’t do much except drink beer and watch TV. Even when the family’s fishing boat sinks on the last day of school, Big Skiff doesn’t lift a finger. So it’s up to Little Skiff to raise the sunken Mary Rose and repair the damage to her hull. Then he sets out to earn enough money to rebu…

Book Review: The Matchlock Gun by Walter D. Edmonds
Book Reviews / November 20, 2005

Walter Edmonds specialized in historical fiction, set in colonial New York. Some of his adult books have achieved near-classic status, such as In the Hands of the Seneca and Drums Along the Mohawk. But generations of children know him mainly as the author of this brief story, which won the 1942 Newbery Medal.