Our author takeover today comes from Chloe Seager, with a missing scene from her new hilarious and relatable UK YA book in the Editing Emma series. Like any Potterhead, Chloe is no stranger to thinking about Hogwarts houses. Find out who of her characters Chloe would sort in to which house, and why.

We are delighted to reveal the stunning UK cover of a brand new YA contemporary fantasy by debut author Christine Lynn Herman. The Devouring Gray follows four teens who have the power to protect their town from a monster – if their families' dark secrets don't devour them first. It's the perfect read for Potterheads who love a bit of mystery with their monsters.

In our July Author Takeover, we're joined by Simon James Green, whose hilarious Noah Can't Even sequel, Noah Could Never, is out now in the UK. With parallels to Goblet of Fire and Harry's encounters with Beauxbatons and Durmstrang students, Simon examines the perils of expectations and stereotypes. Of course, there are lots of laughs along the way while Noah figures it out.

Joining us for an Author Takeover today is author and Potterhead Sara Holland, whose fantastic young adult novel Everless is out now. Much like our beloved Potter series, Everless tackles the trouble with becoming obsessed with living forever, and the unfortunate imbalance this creates when it comes to power. Sara joins us today to ask if it's worth it.

Our second Author Takeover for May is from YA author Alice Oseman, whose incredible third novel, I Was Born For This, was published in the UK earlier this month. An absolute must-read for everyone who has ever been involved in fandom, Alice's novel has a particularly insightful exploration of the light and dark side of shipping, something the Potter fandom knows all about.

Welcome to our Author Takeover for May, with a guest post from Lucy Christopher. Her new YA novel, Storm-Wake, is a modern reimagining of The Tempest. It is a spellbinding tale of transformation and illusion that moves between the realms of dream and reality. Lucy discusses elemental magic and how the stormy island setting lends itself to find magic in the minutiae.

We are joined by debut author Sophie Cameron to celebrate her wonderful new young adult novel Out of the Blue. Set against the backdrop of the frenzied Edinburgh Festival, Out of the Blue is the story of grief, love, and learning to live on. Supported by a group of new friends, Sophie's main character, Jaya, finds her feet, even when angels are falling from the sky.

Our March Author Takeover comes from Akemi Dawn Bowman, author of "Starfish", which is publishing in the UK next month. Her stunning debut novel examines social anxiety, toxic relationships, rejection, and the importance of being true to yourself. Today Akemi looks at the similarities between Harry and her main character, Kiko, and the paths they tread.

In our first Author Takeover of 2018, we are joined by the New York Times–bestselling author of How to Hang a Witch, Adriana Mather. A spellbinding story of witchcraft, ghosts, and a destructive age-old curse, How to Hang a Witch was partially inspired by Adriana's own family history.

This month's Author Takeover comes from a "Harry Potter" superfan, author Annabel Pitcher. Her new teen novella, "The Last Days of Archie Maxwell", explores the aftermath of secrets revealed. Published by dyslexia-friendly publisher Barrington Stoke, Archie's story is a heartfelt and accessible story exploring the boundaries of love – particularly upon realizing a parental figure may not be all that they seem.

Book Review: Juliet Dove, Queen of Love by Bruce Coville
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

I was mistaken when I said that the Magic Shop Books were complete in four books. As recently as 2003, this fifth book came out, once more featuring Mr. Elives and his Magic Supplies shop, as well as Ms. Priest and their “immortal vermin” friends, Jerome and Roxanne, the talking rats.

Book Review: The Wizard of Washington Square by Jane Yolen
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

David and his terrier, D. Dog, have only lived in New York City for a week when they go for a walk in Washington Square Park. David is feeling lonely and bored until he meets Leila, a girl his age who still believes in things like wizards. Grudgingly, David goes along with Leila on an adventure to discover the little, forgetful, second-class wizard who lives under the fountain in Washington Square.

Book Review: The Young Man and the Sea by Rodman Philbrick
Book Reviews / December 17, 2005

Samuel “Skiff” Beaman, Jr., is twelve years old and small for his age; but he carries a lot of responsibility. Since his mother died, his father doesn’t do much except drink beer and watch TV. Even when the family’s fishing boat sinks on the last day of school, Big Skiff doesn’t lift a finger. So it’s up to Little Skiff to raise the sunken Mary Rose and repair the damage to her hull. Then he sets out to earn enough money to rebu…

Book Review: The Matchlock Gun by Walter D. Edmonds
Book Reviews / November 20, 2005

Walter Edmonds specialized in historical fiction, set in colonial New York. Some of his adult books have achieved near-classic status, such as In the Hands of the Seneca and Drums Along the Mohawk. But generations of children know him mainly as the author of this brief story, which won the 1942 Newbery Medal.

Book Review: The Dragon Guard by Emily Drake
Book Reviews / November 12, 2005

This third book in the series that started with The Magickers continues as the most obvious “American answer to Harry Potter” — one that even makes references to Harry Potter, as well as Star Wars, Star Trek, and The Lord of the Rings. Set in Southern California, the series follows the adventures of a group of “talented” children who first found out that they were Magickers while attending Camp Ravenwyng for the summer.

Book Review: The Curse of Arkady by Emily Drake
Book Reviews / November 12, 2005

Here is Book Two in a series that could be billed as, “If Harry Potter were an American.” What a difference that would make! Instead of an underfed, mistreated, Quidditch-playing orphan named Harry Potter, he would be a bullied, soccer-playing boy named Jason Adrian whose step-stepfather is rather nice, and whose stepmother worries about him so much that it causes problems. Instead of owls, he and his friends from the past summe…

Book Review: The Door in the Wall by Marguerite de Angeli
Book Reviews / November 12, 2005

As this book begins, 10-year-old Robin is helpless and alone. Duty to the king and queen have taken his parents away from him, plague has taken his servants, and a mysterious illness has taken the use of his legs. His dreams of being a page and, some day, a knight seem dashed beyond repair.

Book Review: Wizards at War by Diane Duane
Book Reviews / October 16, 2005

The Young Wizards series has always been among my top recommendations when Harry Potter fans ask what to read next. So, I was already thrilled when I found out that this eighth book in the series was coming out. Then I got an even bigger thrill when Diane Duane HERSELF “owled” me through the COS Forums. Do you dig that, people? The author of So You Want to Be a Wizard is a member of your forums! And she has read my reviews of he…

Book Review: The Skull of Truth by Bruce Coville
Book Reviews / October 16, 2005

In the other three "Magic Shop Books," the adventure begins when a child, running from some bullies (or at least, from a girl who wants to kiss him) finds himself on a strange street, in front of a strange shop owned by Mr. Elives. And then the child spends a handful of pocket change to buy a magical item that can help him or her deal with his own special problem. Charlie Eggleston’s adventure begins a bit differently. Charlie h…