Our second Author Takeover for May is from YA author Alice Oseman, whose incredible third novel, I Was Born For This, was published in the UK earlier this month. An absolute must-read for everyone who has ever been involved in fandom, Alice's novel has a particularly insightful exploration of the light and dark side of shipping, something the Potter fandom knows all about.

Welcome to our Author Takeover for May, with a guest post from Lucy Christopher. Her new YA novel, Storm-Wake, is a modern reimagining of The Tempest. It is a spellbinding tale of transformation and illusion that moves between the realms of dream and reality. Lucy discusses elemental magic and how the stormy island setting lends itself to find magic in the minutiae.

We are joined by debut author Sophie Cameron to celebrate her wonderful new young adult novel Out of the Blue. Set against the backdrop of the frenzied Edinburgh Festival, Out of the Blue is the story of grief, love, and learning to live on. Supported by a group of new friends, Sophie's main character, Jaya, finds her feet, even when angels are falling from the sky.

Our March Author Takeover comes from Akemi Dawn Bowman, author of "Starfish", which is publishing in the UK next month. Her stunning debut novel examines social anxiety, toxic relationships, rejection, and the importance of being true to yourself. Today Akemi looks at the similarities between Harry and her main character, Kiko, and the paths they tread.

In our first Author Takeover of 2018, we are joined by the New York Times–bestselling author of How to Hang a Witch, Adriana Mather. A spellbinding story of witchcraft, ghosts, and a destructive age-old curse, How to Hang a Witch was partially inspired by Adriana's own family history.

This month's Author Takeover comes from a "Harry Potter" superfan, author Annabel Pitcher. Her new teen novella, "The Last Days of Archie Maxwell", explores the aftermath of secrets revealed. Published by dyslexia-friendly publisher Barrington Stoke, Archie's story is a heartfelt and accessible story exploring the boundaries of love – particularly upon realizing a parental figure may not be all that they seem.

Mostly cast as the villain, often without rhyme or reason as to why, witches have always seemed so mysterious. They are the opposite of damsels in distress, Sleeping Beautys, Cinderellas, Snow Whites. They are mistresses of their own fortunes. They have the power to change lives – their own and others’. They have magic.

Our Author Takeover this month is dedicated to everyone headed to university/college this autumn/fall! It comes from Brit authors Lucy and Tom, whose novel "Freshers" is all about that first transitional year. In particular, the benefits of fandom and clubs for finding your people.

Our Author Takeover for July comes from Aisha Bushby, a debut author and Potterhead whose short story "Marionette Girl" is published next month in "A Change Is Gonna Come" from Stripes. #ChangeBook is an anthology of stories and poetry from BAME writers on the theme of change.

Our May Author Takeover is by Cat Clarke, whose latest YA novel, "Girlhood", is a darkly compulsive story about love, death, and growing up under the shadow of grief. Set in a boarding school in Scotland, the familiar halls are the perfect place for "Potter" fans to escape to in this compulsive, addictive read. Yet there are some sinister secrets that threaten to tear friendships apart.

Book Review: The Princess and Curdie by George MacDonald
Book Reviews / June 22, 2005

The sequel to The Princess and the Goblin begins with a taste of the sort of disappointment that, in real-life stories, often follows the “happily ever after” ending. Curdie, the miner’s son, no longer has the Princess Irene to protect or the goblins and their bizarre creatures to fight against. He doesn'’t whistle or sing any more, he no longer spends much time looking at beautiful animals and plants, he is not such a good son …

Book Review: The Golden Key by George MacDonald
Book Reviews / June 22, 2005

A boy named Mossy hears tell of a golden key that can be found at the end of the rainbow. One evening at sunset, he crosses into fairyland and finds that key—only to become involved in a much longer quest, to find the lock that it opens. A girl named Tangle runs away from her sad home and is adopted by a fairy grandmother, who is served by feathered fish that swim through the air. Years pass in moments, characters age backwards …

Book Review: H.M.S. Surprise by Patrick O’Brian
Book Reviews / June 16, 2005

I am occasionally criticized for focusing my readings (and writings) too narrowly, and not posting enough reviews of adult novels. Well, here’s an adult novel for you, definitely. There is so much historical research behind these books, they should be required reading for history majors. Like a veritable Sybill Trelawney, O’Brian “channels” the style of speaking, the political situation, the social attitudes, and the intricate d…

Book Review: Post Captain by Patrick O’Brian
Book Reviews / June 3, 2005

This is the second book in the series that began with Master and Commander. It continues to follow the, at times, strained friendship between a brash young Royal Navy officer named Jack Aubrey and the physician, ship’s surgeon, naturalist, and sometime spy named Stephen Maturin

Book Review: The Wonderful Adventures of Nils by Selma Lagerlöf
Book Reviews / May 27, 2005

In 1909, Selma Lagerlöf became the first woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature. Three years earlier, she wrote this delicious book that weaves true lessons of the history, geography, and wildlife of Sweden into folk tale or fairy tale episodes. It is sometimes exciting, suspenseful, and scary. Other times it is witty or silly. And now and then, it is so wistful and even tragic that it will fill your eyes with tears. This b…

Book Review: Master and Commander by Patrick O’Brian
Book Reviews / May 27, 2005

You may have seen the very excellent film Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, a curiously titled film, so named because it is loosely based on two different books by the same author. Patrick O’Brian’s long series of naval novels about a British captain in the Napoleonic Wars begins with this book; the one called The Far Side of the World was the tenth of twenty books, all of them centering on the exploits of Captain…

Book Review: The Callender Papers by Cynthia Voigt
Book Reviews / May 20, 2005

This “gothic novel for young readers” won the Edgar Allan Poe award and comes from the Newbery-medal-winning author of Dicey’s Song. Set in the late 1800’s, it is the tale of a thirteen-year-old girl, raised by a schoolmistress “Aunt” (who actually isn’t a blood relative) who is hired to spend the summer sorting out the family papers of a cold and forbidding widower named Mr. Thiel at his secluded mansion in the New England countryside.

Book Review: Wild Magic by Tamora Pierce
Book Reviews / May 20, 2005

All right, I’ve finally done it. After 4,322,845 e-mails begging, bribing, threatening, and demanding that I read something by Tamora Pierce and review it for the Book Trolley, I finally took the hint. Now PLEASE don’t say I never listened to you! And pleeeease believe me when I say that I WILL read more books by Tamora Pierce and review them in due time. So please be patient!

Book Review: The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald
Book Reviews / May 20, 2005

George MacDonald (1824-1905) was a Scottish Congregationalist minister whose tolerant views caused him so much trouble that he switched to a career in writing. Even so, it wasn'’t until late in his career that he began writing stories for children, which are mainly what he is remembered for today. To MacDonald’s eleven fairy-tale-loving children, we owe not only the pleasure of reading their father’s books, but perhaps even Lewi…