The danger for a mortal girl in the High Court of Faerie is very real, even if she is playing puppet-master with the High King. Jude only has a year and a day to convince Cardan to stay on the throne and protect her brother Oak until he is ready to rule. Will Cardan agree? Check out our review of Holly Black's newest book in The Folk of the Air series, The Wicked King.

In this sequel to Ash Princess, Laura Sebastian takes the reader on an exciting and fast-paced journey through new kingdoms and new magic as Theo works to regain her kingdom.

Things are going really well for Rukhsana – graduation is coming up, she just got a full scholarship to Caltech, and she’s totally in love with her beautiful girlfriend, Ariana. The only hiccup is that she hasn’t told her parents she’s gay.

The wait is over for the sequel to Garth Nix and Sean Williams’ Have Sword, Will Travel! This Nordic saga picks up right where the first book left off, with Odo and Eleanor rushing toward the village green to save their neighbors from an unexpected Bilewolf attack.

Min, a 13-year-old fox spirit who – like the rest of her family – usually takes human form, dreams of joining the Space Forces like her older brother, Jun. But when a special investigator arrives at Min’s home and informs her family that Jun has deserted, Min knows that something is terribly wrong.

Fans of the podcast Welcome to Night Vale – and its associated tie-in novels – will be excited to learn that cocreator Joseph Fink has recently published another Night Vale–adjacent novel: Alice Isn’t Dead.

At long last, Bloodwitch, by Susan Dennard, is almost here! And Witchlanders can rejoice because this third installment in the Witchlands series brings all the magic and excitement we’ve been hoping for!

In this sequel to Exo, hardened soldier Donovan Reyes tries to adjust back to his regimented military lifestyle after his run-in with insurgent group Sapience a few months ago. Unfortunately, he won't get much time to reflect – not only is Sapience ramping up its terrorist activities, but zhree communications with the home planet have taken a dark turn.

One of the most interesting and remarkable books I have ever read, The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein follows a young woman as she tries to tame two monsters: one, her lover; and the other? Herself.

Bronte Mettlestone has just learned her parents have been killed by pirates. Since she hasn’t seen them since she was a baby, this news isn’t as devastating as one might expect, but it is rather... inconvenient, especially since they’ve left her a set of faery cross-stitched instructions to carry out.

Book Review: The Golden Key by George MacDonald
Book Reviews / June 22, 2005

A boy named Mossy hears tell of a golden key that can be found at the end of the rainbow. One evening at sunset, he crosses into fairyland and finds that key—only to become involved in a much longer quest, to find the lock that it opens. A girl named Tangle runs away from her sad home and is adopted by a fairy grandmother, who is served by feathered fish that swim through the air. Years pass in moments, characters age backwards …

Book Review: H.M.S. Surprise by Patrick O’Brian
Book Reviews / June 16, 2005

I am occasionally criticized for focusing my readings (and writings) too narrowly, and not posting enough reviews of adult novels. Well, here’s an adult novel for you, definitely. There is so much historical research behind these books, they should be required reading for history majors. Like a veritable Sybill Trelawney, O’Brian “channels” the style of speaking, the political situation, the social attitudes, and the intricate d…

Book Review: Post Captain by Patrick O’Brian
Book Reviews / June 3, 2005

This is the second book in the series that began with Master and Commander. It continues to follow the, at times, strained friendship between a brash young Royal Navy officer named Jack Aubrey and the physician, ship’s surgeon, naturalist, and sometime spy named Stephen Maturin

Book Review: The Wonderful Adventures of Nils by Selma Lagerlöf
Book Reviews / May 27, 2005

In 1909, Selma Lagerlöf became the first woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature. Three years earlier, she wrote this delicious book that weaves true lessons of the history, geography, and wildlife of Sweden into folk tale or fairy tale episodes. It is sometimes exciting, suspenseful, and scary. Other times it is witty or silly. And now and then, it is so wistful and even tragic that it will fill your eyes with tears. This b…

Book Review: Master and Commander by Patrick O’Brian
Book Reviews / May 27, 2005

You may have seen the very excellent film Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, a curiously titled film, so named because it is loosely based on two different books by the same author. Patrick O’Brian’s long series of naval novels about a British captain in the Napoleonic Wars begins with this book; the one called The Far Side of the World was the tenth of twenty books, all of them centering on the exploits of Captain…

Book Review: The Callender Papers by Cynthia Voigt
Book Reviews / May 20, 2005

This “gothic novel for young readers” won the Edgar Allan Poe award and comes from the Newbery-medal-winning author of Dicey’s Song. Set in the late 1800’s, it is the tale of a thirteen-year-old girl, raised by a schoolmistress “Aunt” (who actually isn’t a blood relative) who is hired to spend the summer sorting out the family papers of a cold and forbidding widower named Mr. Thiel at his secluded mansion in the New England countryside.

Book Review: Wild Magic by Tamora Pierce
Book Reviews / May 20, 2005

All right, I’ve finally done it. After 4,322,845 e-mails begging, bribing, threatening, and demanding that I read something by Tamora Pierce and review it for the Book Trolley, I finally took the hint. Now PLEASE don’t say I never listened to you! And pleeeease believe me when I say that I WILL read more books by Tamora Pierce and review them in due time. So please be patient!

Book Review: The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald
Book Reviews / May 20, 2005

George MacDonald (1824-1905) was a Scottish Congregationalist minister whose tolerant views caused him so much trouble that he switched to a career in writing. Even so, it wasn'’t until late in his career that he began writing stories for children, which are mainly what he is remembered for today. To MacDonald’s eleven fairy-tale-loving children, we owe not only the pleasure of reading their father’s books, but perhaps even Lewi…

Book Review: Jacob Have I Loved by Katherine Paterson
Book Reviews / May 4, 2005

The 1981 winner of the Newbery Medal takes its title from a Bible verse that says: “Jacob have I loved, but Esau I hated.” Like the twins of Biblical lore, there is a bitter rivalry between Caroline and Sara Louise——at least, there is in Louise'’s mind. As the nation goes through the anguish of World War II, she is having a rough time of her own.