This month's Author Takeover comes from Robin Talley, whose new YA novel, PULP, examines how the power of storytelling can connect two young women learning about their sexuality and the world around them across the generations. In her Author Takeover, Robin was keen to examine Crimes of Grindelwald and the pitfalls that have befallen the Potterverse in making sure LGBTQ+ people are visible in the wizarding world.

It's almost Halloween and the perfect time to snuggle up with a dark and twisty YA series. This month's Author Takeover, from Kendare Blake, is the perfect introduction to the Three Dark Crowns series. Read which House Kendare associates with her fantasy world's mysterious powers, and figure out your allegiance to the crown.

Our September Author Takeover comes from debut author Anna James, whose dazzling new middle-grade adventure book, Pages & Co: Tilly and the Bookwanderers, is out this month. Anna explores the bookish wonders of Harry Potter and how her own favorite library spots have lent themselves to her imagination.

Our Author Takeover today comes from Chloe Seager, with a missing scene from her new hilarious and relatable UK YA book in the Editing Emma series. Like any Potterhead, Chloe is no stranger to thinking about Hogwarts Houses. Find out whom of her characters Chloe would sort into which House, and why.

We are delighted to reveal the stunning UK cover of a brand new YA contemporary fantasy by debut author Christine Lynn Herman. The Devouring Gray follows four teens who have the power to protect their town from a monster – if their families' dark secrets don't devour them first. It's the perfect read for Potterheads who love a bit of mystery with their monsters.

In our July Author Takeover, we're joined by Simon James Green, whose hilarious Noah Can't Even sequel, Noah Could Never, is out now in the UK. With parallels to Goblet of Fire and Harry's encounters with Beauxbatons and Durmstrang students, Simon examines the perils of expectations and stereotypes. Of course, there are lots of laughs along the way while Noah figures it out.

Joining us for an Author Takeover today is author and Potterhead Sara Holland, whose fantastic young adult novel Everless is out now. Much like our beloved Potter series, Everless tackles the trouble with becoming obsessed with living forever, and the unfortunate imbalance this creates when it comes to power. Sara joins us today to ask if it's worth it.

Our second Author Takeover for May is from YA author Alice Oseman, whose incredible third novel, I Was Born For This, was published in the UK earlier this month. An absolute must-read for everyone who has ever been involved in fandom, Alice's novel has a particularly insightful exploration of the light and dark side of shipping, something the Potter fandom knows all about.

Welcome to our Author Takeover for May, with a guest post from Lucy Christopher. Her new YA novel, Storm-Wake, is a modern reimagining of The Tempest. It is a spellbinding tale of transformation and illusion that moves between the realms of dream and reality. Lucy discusses elemental magic and how the stormy island setting lends itself to find magic in the minutiae.

We are joined by debut author Sophie Cameron to celebrate her wonderful new young adult novel Out of the Blue. Set against the backdrop of the frenzied Edinburgh Festival, Out of the Blue is the story of grief, love, and learning to live on. Supported by a group of new friends, Sophie's main character, Jaya, finds her feet, even when angels are falling from the sky.

Book Review: The Blue Sword by Robin McKinley
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

This Newbery Honor book is the first in a series of novels about the fantasy realm of Damar, which also includes the Newbery Medal-winning The Hero and the Crown. And Potterheads will be amazed to learn that this book contains both a Harry and a Draco. Only Draco, in this case, is a horse; and Harry is a girl.

Book Review: The Orange Fairy Book Editor Andrew Lang
Book Reviews / January 28, 2005

Mr. Lang’s prefaces to his twelve “fairy books of many colours” are often very informative, particularly about what makes fairy stories so important, and how to answer the objections of their critics. The preface to the Orange Fairy Book is no exception. Here Mr. Lang introduces 33 stories from a variety of cultures and traditions, admitting that some of the more “cruel and savage deeds” from the original stories had to be toned…

Book Review: Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts by David Baggett & Shawn E. Klein
Book Reviews / November 20, 2004

Put on your thinking caps! It's time to go to Hogwarts (extension program for Muggles) and study philosophy. Now, don't give me that look. It's not as bad as it sounds--certainly not the way it's presented here. The authors of the sixteen essays in this cleverly edited book have used the magic of Hogwarts (and a lot of humor) to present a subject that makes many of us want to run away in fright (or pass out in boredom) actually …

Book Review: The Merchant of Death (Pendragon Book One) by D.J. MacHale
Book Reviews / November 20, 2004

Folks, I am without a doubt the doofus of the decade; for I bought only the first book of this series, to try it out and see if I would like it...and by the time I got around to reading it, I had so many other books (and so few dollars) lined up that buying the rest of the series was out of the question...and I can hardly wait to read them! In fact, I had a hard time concentrating at work today because I was so looking forward t…

Book Review: The Whipping Boy by Sid Fleischman
Book Reviews / November 17, 2004

The 1987 winner of the Newbery Medal is this quickly-read little book, set in an unnamed kingdom in an unspecified age when highwaymen were the objects of song and legend, when dancing bears and dog-and-rat pits were major forms of entertainment, and when spoiled little princes had whipping-boys to take their licks for them.

Book Review: A Sending of Dragons by Jane Yolen
Book Reviews / November 17, 2004

The third book in the Pit Dragon Trilogy finds young dragon-master Jakkin and his beloved Akki living desperate lives as refugees in the mountains, haunted by grief, pursued by searching choppers, and befriended by the five hatchlings of the late Heart's Blood.

Book Review: Dragon’s Blood by Jane Yolen
Book Reviews / November 17, 2004

This is the first novel in the Pit Dragon Trilogy that continues with Heart's Blood. The author has also written a Young Merlin Trilogy and a Tartan Magic trilogy, as well as a Starscape book entitled Briar Rose.

Book Review: Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
Book Reviews / November 17, 2004

Ms. Levine's first children's novel is this 1997 Newbery Honor Book, which has recently been made into a movie. (Robbie's note: Whoops. Don't go to see the movie after all. It really stinks.) And in a way, it's nothing new. It's another version of the classic Cinderella tale, which has been made into countless movies (like Ever After), books (like Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister) and even operas (La Cenerentola by Rossini). Bu…

Book Review: The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley
Book Reviews / November 17, 2004

Though this book won the 1985 Newbery Medal for excellence in children's literature, it is a rather grown-up book. I suppose that proves that a book doesn't have to be about children, or even necessarily written for children, to be enjoyed by young readers.