The danger for a mortal girl in the High Court of Faerie is very real, even if she is playing puppet-master with the High King. Jude only has a year and a day to convince Cardan to stay on the throne and protect her brother Oak until he is ready to rule. Will Cardan agree? Check out our review of Holly Black's newest book in The Folk of the Air series, The Wicked King.

In this sequel to Ash Princess, Laura Sebastian takes the reader on an exciting and fast-paced journey through new kingdoms and new magic as Theo works to regain her kingdom.

Things are going really well for Rukhsana – graduation is coming up, she just got a full scholarship to Caltech, and she’s totally in love with her beautiful girlfriend, Ariana. The only hiccup is that she hasn’t told her parents she’s gay.

The wait is over for the sequel to Garth Nix and Sean Williams’ Have Sword, Will Travel! This Nordic saga picks up right where the first book left off, with Odo and Eleanor rushing toward the village green to save their neighbors from an unexpected Bilewolf attack.

Min, a 13-year-old fox spirit who – like the rest of her family – usually takes human form, dreams of joining the Space Forces like her older brother, Jun. But when a special investigator arrives at Min’s home and informs her family that Jun has deserted, Min knows that something is terribly wrong.

Fans of the podcast Welcome to Night Vale – and its associated tie-in novels – will be excited to learn that cocreator Joseph Fink has recently published another Night Vale–adjacent novel: Alice Isn’t Dead.

At long last, Bloodwitch, by Susan Dennard, is almost here! And Witchlanders can rejoice because this third installment in the Witchlands series brings all the magic and excitement we’ve been hoping for!

In this sequel to Exo, hardened soldier Donovan Reyes tries to adjust back to his regimented military lifestyle after his run-in with insurgent group Sapience a few months ago. Unfortunately, he won't get much time to reflect – not only is Sapience ramping up its terrorist activities, but zhree communications with the home planet have taken a dark turn.

One of the most interesting and remarkable books I have ever read, The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein follows a young woman as she tries to tame two monsters: one, her lover; and the other? Herself.

Bronte Mettlestone has just learned her parents have been killed by pirates. Since she hasn’t seen them since she was a baby, this news isn’t as devastating as one might expect, but it is rather... inconvenient, especially since they’ve left her a set of faery cross-stitched instructions to carry out.

Book Review: The Witches by Roald Dahl
Book Reviews / April 5, 2005

A little orphan boy, being raised by his cigar-chomping Norwegian grandmother, comes to an English resort hotel for a seaside cure. While he is training his pet mice (William and Mary) to do tricks, he makes the horrifying discovery that all his Grandma's stories about witches are true. They really do have square, toeless feet, pointy teeth, claws on their fingers, and eyes that glow purple, and they think children smell like do…

Book Review: Five Children and It by E. Nesbit
Book Reviews / April 5, 2005

E is short for Edith, a British-authoress of magical stories for children who also happened to be an outspoken feminist and socialist in her time (late 19th century, early 20th). This one is regarded as her masterpiece. It really is quite a lot of fun. It mostly has to do with four children, really, though from time to time their helpless baby brother also gets involved.

Book Review: The Red Fairy Book Editor Andrew Lang
Book Reviews / March 9, 2005

This was the second book of Lang’s historic collection of fairy tales from around the world. It is evident from the brief preface that Lang considered it an afterthought—not up to the standards of the Blue Fairy Book, but filled with good stories that readers would enjoy, even if they were not as well-known. Well, clearly, being well-known isn’t the only test of a great story. And just as clearly, some stories that were well-kno…

Book Review: Rules of the Road by Joan Bauer
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

From the author of Hope Was Here comes this acclaimed 1998 book about 16-year-old Jenna Boller, who knows a lot about selling shoes and a little about driving. On these qualifications she gets the unasked-for job of driving Mrs. Gladstone, the President of the shoe-store chain she works for, from Chicago to Dallas for the big shareholders' meeting. And though her mother isn't keen on letting Jenna go, the fact that her alcoholic…

Book Review: Max the Mighty by Rodman Philbrick
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

This is the sequel to Freak the Mighty, featuring the surviving half of that tragic duo. Maxwell Kane is still big and strong, a loner living in his grandparents' basement, and generally thought of as stupid; but at least, thanks to his late friend Kevin, he can read, and he no longer worries much about his father, aptly nicknamed "Killer Kane," coming to get him.

Book Review: Spindle’s End by Robin McKinley
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

Newbery medal-winning author Robin McKinley is well-known for her novel-length adaptations of fairy tales, such as Deerskin, Beauty, and Rose Daughter. This wonderful fantasy book is her version of "The Sleeping Beauty."

Book Review: Gold Unicorn by Tanith Lee
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

The sequel to Black Unicorn finds young sorceress Tanaquil--whose gift is mending things--nearing the end of her travels to see her world, accompanied by a very patient camel and her adorable, talking pet peeve. As she turns toward home, toward the castle of her eccentric mother, Tanaquil strays into the path of a conquering horde--an army bent on subduing the entire world--and the icy young Empress who believes she is bringing …

Book Review: Black Unicorn by Tanith Lee
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

Tanaquil is a red-headed girl from a long line of red-headed sorceresses. But to her mother's vast disappointment, Tanaquil is no sorceress. Not that Tanaquil is any happier with her lot, cooped up in a castle reeking with unruly magic, with only guards and servants for company, and a desert all around that burns by day and freezes by night. The only thing she has going for her is a talent for fixing things.

Book Review: Deerskin by Robin McKinley
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

From the award-winning author of several novel-sized fantasies featuring strong, romantic heroines, comes this adaptation of an R-rated Perrault fairy tale that was originally called "Donkeyskin."

Book Review: The Blue Sword by Robin McKinley
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

This Newbery Honor book is the first in a series of novels about the fantasy realm of Damar, which also includes the Newbery Medal-winning The Hero and the Crown. And Potterheads will be amazed to learn that this book contains both a Harry and a Draco. Only Draco, in this case, is a horse; and Harry is a girl.