This month's Author Takeover comes from Robin Talley, whose new YA novel, PULP, examines how the power of storytelling can connect two young women learning about their sexuality and the world around them across the generations. In her Author Takeover, Robin was keen to examine Crimes of Grindelwald and the pitfalls that have befallen the Potterverse in making sure LGBTQ+ people are visible in the wizarding world.

It's almost Halloween and the perfect time to snuggle up with a dark and twisty YA series. This month's Author Takeover, from Kendare Blake, is the perfect introduction to the Three Dark Crowns series. Read which House Kendare associates with her fantasy world's mysterious powers, and figure out your allegiance to the crown.

Our September Author Takeover comes from debut author Anna James, whose dazzling new middle-grade adventure book, Pages & Co: Tilly and the Bookwanderers, is out this month. Anna explores the bookish wonders of Harry Potter and how her own favorite library spots have lent themselves to her imagination.

Our Author Takeover today comes from Chloe Seager, with a missing scene from her new hilarious and relatable UK YA book in the Editing Emma series. Like any Potterhead, Chloe is no stranger to thinking about Hogwarts Houses. Find out whom of her characters Chloe would sort into which House, and why.

We are delighted to reveal the stunning UK cover of a brand new YA contemporary fantasy by debut author Christine Lynn Herman. The Devouring Gray follows four teens who have the power to protect their town from a monster – if their families' dark secrets don't devour them first. It's the perfect read for Potterheads who love a bit of mystery with their monsters.

In our July Author Takeover, we're joined by Simon James Green, whose hilarious Noah Can't Even sequel, Noah Could Never, is out now in the UK. With parallels to Goblet of Fire and Harry's encounters with Beauxbatons and Durmstrang students, Simon examines the perils of expectations and stereotypes. Of course, there are lots of laughs along the way while Noah figures it out.

Joining us for an Author Takeover today is author and Potterhead Sara Holland, whose fantastic young adult novel Everless is out now. Much like our beloved Potter series, Everless tackles the trouble with becoming obsessed with living forever, and the unfortunate imbalance this creates when it comes to power. Sara joins us today to ask if it's worth it.

Our second Author Takeover for May is from YA author Alice Oseman, whose incredible third novel, I Was Born For This, was published in the UK earlier this month. An absolute must-read for everyone who has ever been involved in fandom, Alice's novel has a particularly insightful exploration of the light and dark side of shipping, something the Potter fandom knows all about.

Welcome to our Author Takeover for May, with a guest post from Lucy Christopher. Her new YA novel, Storm-Wake, is a modern reimagining of The Tempest. It is a spellbinding tale of transformation and illusion that moves between the realms of dream and reality. Lucy discusses elemental magic and how the stormy island setting lends itself to find magic in the minutiae.

We are joined by debut author Sophie Cameron to celebrate her wonderful new young adult novel Out of the Blue. Set against the backdrop of the frenzied Edinburgh Festival, Out of the Blue is the story of grief, love, and learning to live on. Supported by a group of new friends, Sophie's main character, Jaya, finds her feet, even when angels are falling from the sky.

Book Review: The Cockatrice Boys by Joan Aiken
Book Reviews / November 10, 2004

From the Wolves series, featuring Dido Twite, I had already come to regard Joan Aiken as a wonderful writer with a flair for colloquial British speech, humor, adventure, and the clash of titanic forces of good and evil. From Diana Wynne Jones' Deep Secret I had come to regard the Starscape series (penned by a variety of authors) as being possibly the best-kept secret in young-adult fiction. Both of these impressions are confirme…

Book Review: The Holy Bible by miscellaneous authors
Book Reviews / November 9, 2004

There are several good reasons not to include a review of "the Good Book" on the Book Trolley. First, MuggleNet does not sponsor any particular religion, and my views about the Bible are not necessarily the views of MuggleNet, its webmaster, its editors, or its devoted readers. I'm sure they have no intention of letting this site be used for religious propaganda. Second, it might seem beneath the dignity of the Bible, to those o…

Book Review: Sour Land by William H. Armstrong
Book Reviews / October 20, 2004

This is a companion book to Sounder, and in my opinion, an even more moving book. Perhaps its power lies in its personal, intimate nature. Unlike Sounder, this book is full of characters with lifelike names. It does not come across as a universal parable—though it may be that—but as a portrait of a handful of very specific, individual people. People who are bound together by loss and by love, by hard work and the enjoyment of st…

Book Review: Sounder by William H. Armstrong
Book Reviews / October 20, 2004

This is a still, gentle story about loss, waiting, and searching, set in the Southern U. S. around the turn of the 20th century. It mostly concerns a family circle--particularly the mother, father, and oldest boy--and their coon dog, Sounder. Touched by tragedy and racial injustice, it puts a high value on hope, on the love of nature, and on the love of words.

Book Review: Peter Pan and Wendy by J. M. Barrie
Book Reviews / October 20, 2004

Written in 1906 to benefit a London children's hospital, this classic has gone through such a wringer of stage, film, and animated adaptations, not to mention picture-book retellings, that reading or hearing the original text is now somewhat unusual; but not nearly as unusual as the story itself, which is by turns witty and bizarre and melancholy and gruesome, and always narrated in a uniquely teasing way.

Book Review: Ramona and Her Father by Beverly Cleary
Book Reviews / October 20, 2004

Second-grader Ramona Quimby is distressed when her father loses his job. This brings changes in her family, which includes an older sister "Beezus" (given name Beatrice) who is going through that "difficult age," a cat who snubs cheap cat food, and a mother who has to work so hard to support the family that she doesn't have time to do things like sewing a sheep costume for the Christmas program. But what worries Ramona most is h…

Book Review: Dicey’s Song by Cynthia Voigt
Book Reviews / October 12, 2004

Dicey is the oldest of four siblings who are in the process of being adopted by their grandmother, after being abandoned by their mentally ill mother, and making their way alone from Boston to Eastern Maryland. Now that school has started and a little normalcy has come into their lives, they should live happily ever after, right?