Finding out you're a demon hunter destined to work with the Monkey King? Probably not going to help Genie Lo on her college applications.

In "Stranger Things: Runaway Max", a middle-grade novel, author Brenna Yovanoff gives readers a chance to get inside the head of Max Mayfield, the red-haired newcomer to Hawkins, Indiana.

"Forest of a Thousand Lanterns" follows a young peasant girl named Xifeng, said to be destined for greatness – but only if she lets herself be consumed by the dark power growing within her.

In "The Art of Mindful Reading", bibliotherapist Ella Berthoud shares tips for how to use our reading to practice mindfulness and meditation, including how to work reading into a busy schedule and get the most out of every book we read.

Lucas and Ignacio are both young seminary students when they fall in love – a love taboo in the Colombia of the 1990s, and especially so for young men expected to enter the Catholic priesthood.

Evan's visions from a past life could help him save the life of someone in his current life – but at what cost?

Fatima doesn’t remember life before her adopted family, especially not since almost the entire city of Noor was slaughtered by a chaotic djinn tribe, the Shayateen. When an act of violence awakens in Fatima her own djinn fire, she'll have to figure out how to save Noor from the Shayateen's return.

When Ben comes out to their parents as non-binary, they immediately kick them out of the house. With nowhere else to turn, Ben moves in with their estranged older sister and starts the second half of their senior year at a new school.

The Kingdom isn't necessarily the happiest place on Earth, especially for Ana, a robot princess programmed to make guests happy.

In Stepsister, author Jennifer Donnelly twists a fairy tale we think we know to focus not on the kind, beautiful Cinderella, but on her sister Isabelle – who cuts off her own toes to try and fill Cinderella’s dainty shoes.

Book Review: It’s Like This, Cat by Emily Neville
Book Reviews / September 29, 2004

The 1964 winner of the Newbery Medal is a loose, light-hearted story that shows us a slice out of an ordinary kid’s life in Manhattan in the 1960’s. Written in the present tense and first person singular, it seems to capture effortlessly the way of speaking of a city youth at a point in his life when many changes are taking place.

Book Review: Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Patterson
Book Reviews / September 23, 2004

This is a 1972 Newbery Medal winner about a misfit farm boy in Virginia who befriends the tomboyish city girl who moves in next door, and how they invent an imaginary kingdom together. The one complaint I have about this book is that there could have been so much more of it; it seems to go way too fast. It is a breathlessly lyrical moment of beauty where one would like to linger for a while, but it’s over so soon.

Book Review: Ralph S. Mouse by Beverly Cleary
Book Reviews / September 11, 2004

The third book in the series that began with The Mouse and the Motorcycle, and continued with Runaway Ralph, takes off when Ralph befriends the son of the hotel’s new housekeeper. Ryan agrees to take Ralph to school with him, but things turn out as neither of them planned.

Book Review: Runaway Ralph by Beverly Cleary
Book Reviews / September 11, 2004

The sequel to The Mouse and the Motorcycle finds Ralph the mouse growing discontented in his hotel lobby home. His younger brothers, sisters, and cousins keep pestering him to let them ride his toy motorcycle, and his mother and uncle won’t leave him alone. Finally Ralph decides to runaway to a camp whose bugle calls he can hear every morning and evening.

Book Review: Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary
Book Reviews / September 11, 2004

I should have read this book 20 years ago. This story about a lonely boy, learning to live with his parents’ divorce, going to a new school where he has no friends, and making his first efforts as a writer, won the Newbery Medal in 1984--the year my parents split up. In lots of ways, it’s like reading the story of my life; but obviously it isn’t about me, and the poignancy of the story isn’t just in my head, or it wouldn’t have …

Book Review: Till We Have Faces by C. S. Lewis
Book Reviews / September 3, 2004

I know a Christian man--I am not sure I would call him a good Christian man, but I won’t deny that he is a sincere one--who raised his sons forbidding them to own or read books about magic, mythology, or science fiction. He was so strict about it that when one of his sons (who rather liked sci-fi and fantasy) went out of town for the summer, he raided the boy’s bedroom and threw out all his books. The same son later turned down …

Book Review: Green Boy by Susan Cooper
Book Reviews / September 3, 2004

Trey is very protective of his sensitive, mute little brother, Lou. They live with their grandparents on an outer island of the Bahamas, from which they often cross to an uninhabited isle to look at shells, birds, and fish. But now Long Pond Cay is threatened by powerful developers who want to build a hotel and casino on the spot and spoil all the beauty and life that is there.