Book Review: The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove by Christopher Moore

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The off-season is usually a sleepy time in the scenic coastal town of Pine Cove, California. This fall, however, events conspire to make it a madcap emergency, combining crime, craziness, a man-eating monster from the depths of the ocean, and an epic wave of horniness. Fasten your Adult Content Advisory: it’s going to be a raunchy comedy from the author of Practical Demonkeeping, which shares this book’s setting and some of its characters. It all ... Read More »

Book Review: The Letter for the King by Tonke Dragt

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It was first published in 1962. It was recognized as the children’s book of the year in 1963, and the best children’s book in 50 years as of 2004. It was translated into fifteen different languages between 1977 and 2011. It has sold over a million copies. It was made into a feature film in 2008. Its author received a knighthood and a lifetime award for youth literature, and is considered the greatest children’s author ... Read More »

Fan of the Week: Lucy – May 4, 2014

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LUCY Age 14 – England GRYFFINDOR How did you become a Harry Potter fan? I always loved the films when I was a kid, and I remember being obsessed with Emma Watson right from the start. I started reading the books when I was in Year 6, which I think was just before The Half Blood Prince film was released. I was hooked almost instantly. I had only just got into reading, though, so it took ... Read More »

Book Review: No Place Like Oz by Danielle Paige

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An alternate title for this story could have been “Dorothy Gale: My journey to the dark side” as we see Dorothy work her way into becoming the villain she's set to play in the following full-length novel... Read More »

Robbie Reviews The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith

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Here is a most satisfying recent example of the classic type of private-eye novel. The detective is the whimsically named Cormoran Strike, an ex-military policeman whose career in the army ended when a roadside bomb took away half a leg. His name has nothing to do with his father, a philandering superstar rock musician with whom he has no relationship whatever, and a lot to do with his “supergroupie” mother, who was flaky and impractical ... Read More »

Taking Classes on “Harry Potter”

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So you want to take a class on "Harry Potter". Think about these five things before you do. Read More »

How Would You Use Your Magic?

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Imagine you woke up one day with the ability to perform any of the types of magic performed by the witches and wizards of the "Harry Potter" series, but you could only choose one purpose for this skill. What would you do with this ability? Read More »

Theater Review: ‘Peddling’, Starring & Written by Harry Melling

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The themes of rewind and repetition are threaded through Peddling, the writing début of Harry Melling, best known for his run as the unpleasant Dudley Dursley in the Harry Potter films. But you’ll find no hint of Dudley here; Melling has shed Dudley’s cartoonishly menacing bulk—literally and figuratively—and instead inhabits a complex, energetic homeless boy who makes his living by selling ‘everyday essentials’ door to door. Read More »

Fan Fiction, Anyone?

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You can start a new series or novel, but even though they provide you with excitement and new characters to fangirl about, they don’t give you the feeling of coming back home (at least most don’t). What do you do then? How do you deal with this need for more potterness? Fan fiction. Read More »

Harry Potter and the Hero’s Journey

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Last week, I found a post on Tumblr that analyzed a character from the TV show "Doctor Who" and compared that character's journey to the pattern of Joseph Campbell's "monomyth," or "the hero's journey" (the original post can be found here). Monomyth, as conveniently explained by Wikipedia, "is a basic pattern that its proponents argue is found in many narratives from around the world." Essentially, it is the theory that many great literary heroes have all gone through the same seventeen stages of adventure (i.e., their stories all follow the same pattern). After researching this for a while, I was inspired to make my own comparisons between Harry's journey in the "Harry Potter" series to see if it matched up with Joseph Campbell's pattern. Read More »