Today, the next installment of the "Order of the MoonStone" series released!

Imogen, a writer, and her sister Marin, a dancer, are ecstatic when they find that they’ve both been accepted for prestigious nine-month fellowships at Melete, a renowned artists’ retreat. Although now both adults with budding careers, they still live in the shadow of an emotionally (and sometimes physically) abusive childhood instigated by their manipulative mother. This retreat is their chance not only to better their art, but to really get ...

Mercy Wong has big dreams, hoping to become a successful businesswoman who earns enough to move her family out of their tight Chinatown quarters. In the San Francisco of 1906, this dream seems near enough to impossible, but Mercy’s resourcefulness earns her a place at St. Clare’s Boarding School, one of the most respected girls’ schools in the country.

Guy Gavriel Kay may be known to many as a fantasy author, but his new novel, "Children of Earth and Sky", is more an alternate Renaissance history than anything else. There’s just the barest whiff of magic thrown in there, but even without it, Kay has created a rich and absorbing epic that you can really get lost in.

"The Countdown" is the final book in the "Taking" trilogy.

It’s been a long year to wait for the second installment in Gwenda Bond’s YA series chronicling the teenage adventures of Lois Lane, ace reporter and Superman love interest, but we’re happy to report that "Lois Lane: Double Down" is finally here!

"Me Before You" by Jojo Moyes is the story of 35-year-old Will, who, having suffered a severe motorcycle accident several months previously, requires 24-hour care, and Lou, a 26-year-old woman who has never left the safe haven of her small town. When Lou gets made redundant at her job in a cake shop, she tries and fails at several career routes before stumbling across the position of Will’s carer.

The conclusion to Maggie Stiefvater’s "Raven Cycle" has got to be one of the most anticipated YA book releases of the season. Although many fans were disappointed when the release of the book was pushed back a few months, I think you’re going to find that the delay was worth the wait!

After losing her mother in a tragic car accident, Sass finds herself being shipped to Cornwall, England to live with an uncle she’s never met. The English seaside is beautiful, but it can’t heal the hole she feels inside of her. Alex is British royalty, fleeing to his ancestral home by the sea to try to escape the paparazzi swirling around him in the wake of his parents’ divorce. When he runs across Sass trespassing on family land, captivated ...

"Chasing Water: Elegy of an Olympian" is a memoir tracing both the troubles and accomplishments of Olympic swimmer Anthony Ervin, from his breakout performance at the 2000 Sydney Games to his bad-boy image and eventual reappearance at the London Games in 2012.

Book Review: “A Little Something Different” by Sandy Hall
Book Reviews / September 14, 2014

"A Little Something Different" is a romantic comedy for anyone who dabbles in drabbles, a college age meet cute split up into 14 different points of view. When Lea and Gabe bump into each other at the beginning of the semester, their chemistry is obvious to everyone around them, from their best friends, their creative writing teacher, the local Starbucks baristas, to the park bench and a squirrel. With a shared love of "Buffy", a joi...

Book Review: “Darkness Hidden” by Zoë Marriott
Book Reviews / September 13, 2014

A dazzling continuation of Marriott's urban fantasy series. Previously, in "Name of the Blade", three teens in London battled a terrifying creature straight out of Japanese mythology. In "Darkness Hidden", the second book of the series, a whole new level of terror is unleashed from the underworld on to the streets, and Mio, Jack, and Shinobu will have to sacrifice even more to keep the world safe. All to protect the mysterious ancest...

Book Review: Marie Antoinette, Serial Killer by Katie Alender
Book Reviews / August 31, 2014

Colette Iselin has had a rough year, but a class trip to France offers an escape from all her troubles. Once she arrives, Colette begins to see the ghost of Marie Antoinette, who appears to be murdering members of old aristocratic families all around Paris. And, of course, Colette soon realizes that she might be next!

Book Review: “Can’t Look Away” by Donna Cooner
Book Reviews / August 29, 2014

"Can’t Look Away" by Donna Conner tells the story of Torrey Grey, teenage fashion blogger extraordinaire, after her younger sister Miranda is killed by a drunk driver. Not only must Torrey deal with the devastating loss of her sister, but the pressure to maintain her celebrity as a popular YouTube blogger.

Book Review: “If You’re Reading This” by Trent Reedy
Book Reviews / August 27, 2014

"If You’re Reading This" by Trent Reedy is a rare breed of YA novel: one written for young men. The novel follows sixteen-year-old Mike, whose family is barely making ends meet seven years after the death of his father fighting in Afghanistan. When he least expects it, he begins receiving letters written to him by his father before his death.

Book Review: “Faces of the Dead” by Suzanne Weyn
Book Reviews / August 27, 2014

"Faces of the Dead" has a fascinating premise—Princess Marie-Thérèse-Charlotte, daughter of Marie Antoinette, switches places with her lookalike maid during the French Revolution in the late 1790s. She finds herself living on the streets of Paris and soon becomes a ward of the talented wax sculptor Mademoiselle Grosholtz, the woman who will later find fame as Madame Tussaud.

Book Review: “A Dirty Job” by Christopher Moore
Book Reviews / August 24, 2014

In the weird version of San Francisco featured in the same author's "Love Story" trilogy of vampire novels—"Bloodsucking Fiends", "You Suck", and "Bite Me"—lives a textbook specimen of the creature known as the Beta Male. His name is Charlie Asher. He runs a second-hand shop (inherited from his father), shares a four-story apartment building (ditto) with his lesbian sister, and can't believe his luck when a beautiful Jewish girl marr...

Book Review: “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” by Neil Gaiman
Book Reviews / August 17, 2014

The narrator never tells us his name. He never says exactly whose funeral brings him back to the town where he grew up. Until he arrives at the shore of the pond beyond the farmhouse at the end of the lane he used to live on, he doesn't even know what has brought him back here. And then he remembers it all.