Mostly cast as the villain, often without rhyme or reason as to why, witches have always seemed so mysterious. They are the opposite of damsels in distress, Sleeping Beautys, Cinderellas, Snow Whites. They are mistresses of their own fortunes. They have the power to change lives – their own and others’. They have magic.

Our Author Takeover this month is dedicated to everyone headed to university/college this autumn/fall! It comes from Brit authors Lucy and Tom, whose novel "Freshers" is all about that first transitional year. In particular, the benefits of fandom and clubs for finding your people.

Our Author Takeover for July comes from Aisha Bushby, a debut author and Potterhead whose short story "Marionette Girl" is published next month in "A Change Is Gonna Come" from Stripes. #ChangeBook is an anthology of stories and poetry from BAME writers on the theme of change.

Our May Author Takeover is by Cat Clarke, whose latest YA novel, "Girlhood", is a darkly compulsive story about love, death, and growing up under the shadow of grief. Set in a boarding school in Scotland, the familiar halls are the perfect place for "Potter" fans to escape to in this compulsive, addictive read. Yet there are some sinister secrets that threaten to tear friendships apart.

Our April Author Takeover features Aliette de Bodard talking about something the "Potter" fandom knows all about: warring Houses. Join Aliette as she discusses her own House wars and the continuation of the beautiful "Dominion of the Fallen" series.

Our new Author Takeover comes from New York Times–bestselling author of "The Lunar Chronicles" Marissa Meyer, with her new novel, "Heartless". The "Potter" fandom knows all about characters with a predetermined fate, and we're well used to the idea of the Chosen One. In Marissa's "Heartless", we have a vision of Wonderland like none you've seen before.

When Mary Adams sees Millais’ depiction of the tragic Ophelia, a whole new world opens up for her. Determined to find out more about the beautiful girl in the painting, she hears the story of Lizzie Siddal – a girl from a modest background, not unlike her own, who has found fame and fortune against the odds. Mary sets out to become a Pre-Raphaelite muse, too, and reinvents herself as Persephone Lavelle.

The first of our March Author Takeovers comes from Gemma Fowler. Her new novel, "Moonlight", is an edge-of-your-seat sci-fi thriller with a contemporary voice. Gemma would be pleased as punch to find herself on the highest tower of Hogwarts. Her soul is still and always will be 13 years old, and her characters embrace teenage rebellion and refusal to blindly comply with authority, much like our Golden Trio.

Our final February Author Takeover comes from Lisa Williamson, whose second novel, "All About Mia", is out now from David Fickling Books. In this standalone after her first book, "The Art of Being Normal", Lisa now turns to look at family dynamics and the structure of sibling personality types.

Just imagine: what would your year look like if you read only marginalized authors? What would the world look like if we all did the same? And how many books do you read each year, anyway? If it’s more than 30, I challenge you to pick up every one of these. I know you can do it!

Book Review: “The Inker’s Shadow” by Allen Say
Book Reviews / September 24, 2015

"The Inker’s Shadow" is a companion to Allen Say’s 2011 graphic memoir "Drawing from Memory." In "Drawing from Memory", Say chronicled his childhood in Japan in WWII and his path to his mentor, cartoonist Noro Shinpei. In "The Inker’s Shadow", Say continues his autobiography, telling of his life in America after he left Japan - and Shinpei - behind.

Book Review: “Beastly Bones” by William Ritter
Book Reviews / September 22, 2015

Abigail has finally convinced Jackaby to let her accompany him into the field again, just in time for their next big case: missing dinosaur bones and a mysterious death. A farmer in nearby Gad's Valley recently discovered an enormous dinosaur skeleton on his land, which means that in addition to solving a murder, Abigail also finally has the chance to follow in her father's footsteps and do some serious science. Of course, Jacka…

Book Review: “A Reluctant Assassin” by J.C. Morrows
Book Reviews / September 21, 2015

"A Reluctant Assassin" is a dystopian novel set in a future United States where monarchs rule, women wear big dresses, and princes must marry to become kings. The story opens at a ball where 25 of the most eligible ladies have been selected from the kingdom in order that the prince might choose his bride. Only, one of them isn't really a wealthy noble; she is an orphan plucked from the streets and trained to assassinate the prince….

Book Review: “The Marvels” by Brian Selznick
Book Reviews / September 15, 2015

The first 400 pages of "The Marvels" are told through illustration, chronicling the exploits of sailing-turned-acting family the Marvels in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and the last 200 pages told in prose, following the story of 13-year-old Joseph Jervis after he runs away from boarding school to stay with his eccentric uncle, Albert Nightingale. Selznick unfurls the relationship between these two stories gradually,…

Book Review: “The Copper Gauntlet” by Holly Black and Cassandra Clare
Book Reviews / September 4, 2015

The second book in the "Magisterium" series, "The Copper Gauntlet" picks up toward the end of the summer after Call’s first year at the Magisterium. Although he hasn’t yet told anyone that he’s housing the soul of the most evil wizard of all time. When a magical artifact, the Alkahest, is stolen from Magisterium custody, Call is almost certain that his father is the culprit - because only the Alkahest has the potential to separa…

Book Review: “Inkdeath” by Cornelia Funke
Book Reviews / September 1, 2015

In the concluding book of the "Inkheart"> trilogy, a blended cast of real-world and fairy-tale characters, brought together by a combination of an author's magical words and a reader's magical voice (well, three or four readers', actually), face the crisis that will determine whether the Inkworld lives happily ever after or descends into everlasting darkness and horror.

Book Review: “The Chessman” by Dolores Gordon-Smith
Book Reviews / August 29, 2015

"The Chessman" is the ninth book in the "Jack Haldean Mystery" series. Set in the 1920s, Jack, a detective novelist, is called in to help solve a murder case involving a body, a church, and a ton of lilies. When one murder spawns into many more, each marked with a chess piece, Jack must track down the serial killer before all his pieces are wiped off the board.