Get ready to feel super with the supremely fun "Not Your Sidekick", the kick-ass story of high-school-student-turned-supervillain-intern Jess Tran and her crush, Abby Jones. This is the perfect book for people who love "Ms. Marvel", "Supergirl", or anyone who has ever taken a “what’s your superpower?” quiz.

The long out-of-print first novel by bestselling author Lev Grossman is newly available again. The slim volume traces a few short days in the life of Hollis Kessler, a directionless 20-something who sleepwalks through his life daydreaming about "Star Trek" and fanciful works of literature.

If you’re an avid follower of MuggleNet’s Potter DIY section, you’ll absolutely love "The Unofficial Guide to Crafting the World of Harry Potter" by Jamie Harrington. It includes crafts of all types, from décor to beauty to school and more!

Catrina and her family have just moved to a new city, Bahía de la Luna, in the hopes that seaside air will help with her younger sister Maya’s cystic fibrosis. Catrina is prepared (sort of) for leaving all her friends behind and starting over at a new school, but she isn’t prepared for everyone in Bahía de la Luna to believe in ghosts...or for those ghosts to be real.

Last year’s novel "Welcome to Night Vale" introduced the cult hit podcast to a whole new audience (not to mention giving devoted fans a longer narrative to chew on). Now, two volumes of episode transcripts (along with special new bonus material) have also been released in print. "Mostly Void, Partially Stars" and "The Great Glowing Coils of the Universe" collect episodes from the first and second year of the podcast’s existence.

It’s not often that we review picture books here on MuggleNet, but of course we weren’t going to pass up the latest release from author and illustrator Mary GrandPré, who also illustrated the original US editions of "Harry Potter". In "Cleonardo, The Little Inventor", GrandPré tells the story of Cleonardo “Cleo” Wren, daughter of Geonardo, granddaughter of Leonardo, and the latest in a long line of inventors.

As the July/August pick of Emma Watson's book club, Our Shared Shelf, "Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl" gives you a vivid look at the '90s riot grrrl scene in Carrie Brownstein's candid, witty voice.

Twenty-five years ago, planes dropped from the sky and ships ran aground, empty, signaling that Ireland was irretrievably cut off from the rest of the world. The Sídhe, ancient fairy folk, had vowed revenge upon the country that exiled them from their homes thousands of years ago. Their retribution is brutal: every adolescent will at some point be called to the Grey Land, where they’ll have to flee, fight, and hide for survival. For them, the ...

In the third installment of the "Magisterium" series, Call and his best friends, Tamara and Aaron, are back for another year of magical training. What’s more, they’re being celebrated as heroes for defeating Master Joseph and bringing the Assembly the head of the most evil wizard who’s ever lived. The only thing putting a damper on things is that someone seems to be trying to kill Call (again) and the terrible burden of keeping hidden the fact...

It may still be months until Season 4 of "Sherlock" airs, but luckily we don’t have to wait nearly as long for the latest escapades of another of our favorite detectives: R.F. Jackaby. The third installment of the series that has been widely hailed as a compelling combination of both "Doctor Who" and "Sherlock Holmes" has arrived, and it’s just as good (if not better) than the first two books.

Book Review: “Railhead” by Philip Reeve
Book Reviews / July 16, 2016

Fans of Philip Reeve’s futuristic "Mortal Engines" quartet or "Larklight" trilogy will be glad to know the author is back with a new steampunk odyssey, which takes place in a future where passengers ride trains (that have their own personalities and consciousness) between worlds. At the beginning of "Railhead", Zen Starling is just a petty thief who loves to ride the rails when he can. Before long he’s caught up in a swirl of events ...

Book Review: “Never Ever” by Sara Saedi
Book Reviews / July 14, 2016

Wylie doesn’t expect to fall for a guy at her brother’s going away party - she’s here to spend time with her brother Joshua, not make small talk - but she especially doesn’t expect to fall for a guy who can fly and lives on an island where teenagers never grow up. When the mysterious Phinn whisks away both Wylie and her two brothers to Minor Island, the Dalton siblings are in for an experience they’ll never forget.

Book Review: “Last Leaves Falling” by Fox Benwell
Book Reviews / July 13, 2016

Abe Sora has ALS, and he’s going to die, and soon. Unlike in many other YA novels that feature a terminally ill protagonist, there’s no hope for remission or salvation. In "Last Leaves Falling", Abe struggles to find a new normal in a life where he won’t go to college, or play baseball, or walk, or fall in love, or...anything. Two new friends he meets in an online chatroom bring a feeling of belonging that he thought he’d lost foreve...

Book Review: “Without Annette” by Jane B. Mason
Book Reviews / July 13, 2016

Josie can’t believe that she and her girlfriend, Annette, are actually escaping their small Minnesota town (and Annette’s alcoholic mother) to attend an elite boarding school in Connecticut. There, she hopes they’ll be free of the stigma of small-town gossip, and that Annette will be safe from her mother’s verbal and physical abuse. But from the moment they arrive, Josie feels Annette pulling away from her, attaching herself to a gro...

Book Review: “Orangeboy” by Patrice Lawrence
Book Reviews / July 12, 2016

Thrilling, dangerous, compelling, mysterious, and intriguing - delve into the curious question of "Orangeboy" for a fast and furious contemporary read. The debut YA novel from author Patrice Lawrence, "Orangeboy" is an action-packed story that hurtles along the streets of London, and your heart will still be pounding after the final page. It is the journey of one young boy’s desperate attempts to outrun the past and a society whose e...

Book Review: “Life is Funny” by E.R. Frank
Book Reviews / July 11, 2016

"Life is Funny" traces the lives of 11 teenagers in one Brooklyn neighborhood over the course of seven years. This ambitious undertaking depicts teens dealing with real-life issues, like self-harm, abuse, family expectations, friendship, and falling in love.

Book Review: “Love Blind” by C. Desir and Jolene Perry
Book Reviews / July 9, 2016

"Love Blind" alternates chapters between protagonists Hailey, a teenage rocker who has the eyes of a 90-year-old (according to her doctor), and Kyle, an extremely shy boy who works the sound board at his high school’s radio station and has a troubled home life. Hailey recruits him to tackle a “fear list” with her - a list where each of them write down their greatest fears and face them, one by one.

Book Review: “Run” by Kody Keplinger
Book Reviews / July 8, 2016

Bo Dickinson and Agnes Atwood don’t seem like they should be best friends - Agnes is the church-going blind girl, and Bo is the latest in the line of no-good Dickinsons, pariahs of the town. Maybe it’s the fact that neither of them has ever really found true friendship that draws them together, but whatever it is, neither of their lives is ever going to be the same again.

Book Review: “Everland” by Wendy Spinale
Book Reviews / July 8, 2016

In this alternate "Peter Pan" retelling, Everland is a post-invasion Steampunk London where almost all of the adults have died of a mysterious contagion, leaving children to fend for themselves against German invader Captain Hanz Otto Oswald Kretschmer - Captain Hook.