We are joined by debut author Sophie Cameron to celebrate her wonderful new young adult novel Out of the Blue. Set against the backdrop of the frenzied Edinburgh Festival, Out of the Blue is the story of grief, love, and learning to live on. Supported by a group of new friends, Sophie's main character, Jaya, finds her feet, even when angels are falling from the sky.

Our March Author Takeover comes from Akemi Dawn Bowman, author of "Starfish", which is publishing in the UK next month. Her stunning debut novel examines social anxiety, toxic relationships, rejection, and the importance of being true to yourself. Today Akemi looks at the similarities between Harry and her main character, Kiko, and the paths they tread.

In our first Author Takeover of 2018, we are joined by the New York Times–bestselling author of How to Hang a Witch, Adriana Mather. A spellbinding story of witchcraft, ghosts, and a destructive age-old curse, How to Hang a Witch was partially inspired by Adriana's own family history.

This month's Author Takeover comes from a "Harry Potter" superfan, author Annabel Pitcher. Her new teen novella, "The Last Days of Archie Maxwell", explores the aftermath of secrets revealed. Published by dyslexia-friendly publisher Barrington Stoke, Archie's story is a heartfelt and accessible story exploring the boundaries of love – particularly upon realizing a parental figure may not be all that they seem.

Mostly cast as the villain, often without rhyme or reason as to why, witches have always seemed so mysterious. They are the opposite of damsels in distress, Sleeping Beautys, Cinderellas, Snow Whites. They are mistresses of their own fortunes. They have the power to change lives – their own and others’. They have magic.

Our Author Takeover this month is dedicated to everyone headed to university/college this autumn/fall! It comes from Brit authors Lucy and Tom, whose novel "Freshers" is all about that first transitional year. In particular, the benefits of fandom and clubs for finding your people.

Our Author Takeover for July comes from Aisha Bushby, a debut author and Potterhead whose short story "Marionette Girl" is published next month in "A Change Is Gonna Come" from Stripes. #ChangeBook is an anthology of stories and poetry from BAME writers on the theme of change.

Our May Author Takeover is by Cat Clarke, whose latest YA novel, "Girlhood", is a darkly compulsive story about love, death, and growing up under the shadow of grief. Set in a boarding school in Scotland, the familiar halls are the perfect place for "Potter" fans to escape to in this compulsive, addictive read. Yet there are some sinister secrets that threaten to tear friendships apart.

Our April Author Takeover features Aliette de Bodard talking about something the "Potter" fandom knows all about: warring Houses. Join Aliette as she discusses her own House wars and the continuation of the beautiful "Dominion of the Fallen" series.

Our new Author Takeover comes from New York Times–bestselling author of "The Lunar Chronicles" Marissa Meyer, with her new novel, "Heartless". The "Potter" fandom knows all about characters with a predetermined fate, and we're well used to the idea of the Chosen One. In Marissa's "Heartless", we have a vision of Wonderland like none you've seen before.

Author Takeover: Family Tapestries, by Adriana Mather
Author Takeover / January 26, 2018

In our first Author Takeover of 2018, we are joined by the New York Times–bestselling author of How to Hang a Witch, Adriana Mather. A spellbinding story of witchcraft, ghosts, and a destructive age-old curse, How to Hang a Witch was partially inspired by Adriana's own family history.

Book Review: “The Woodcutter” by Kate Danley
Book Reviews / January 25, 2018

This book is a deadly serious, grown-up take on the land of stories that never for an instant winks at the reader or acknowledges a real world outside its own Grimm reality. It reveals some of the nastier things usually hidden on the underside of folklore.

Book Review: “Johnny and the Dead” by Terry Pratchett
Book Reviews / January 23, 2018

Of all the people in Blackbury, UK, who could have suddenly developed the ability to see ghosts, it would just have to be Johnny Maxwell. He isn't strong, clever, good-looking, or full of personality. Yet the weird stuff always happens to him. And what makes him weird is that he's always open to it.

Book Review: “Only You Can Save Mankind” by Terry Pratchett
Book Reviews / January 21, 2018

Only You Can Save Mankind is the title of the latest computer game pirated by Johnny's fat hacker pal Wobbler. It's only a step or so beyond Space Invaders (remember? anybody?), in which the player has to blow up alien spaceships from one-seater fighters to the huge mothership. Johnny is doing quite well at it until, just before he fires the kill-shot at the alien mothership, a message comes on his screen: WE WANT TO TALK.

Book Review: “Rapacia: The Second Circle of Heck” by Dale E. Basye
Book Reviews / January 17, 2018

Marlo has matriculated to the Second Circle of Heck, where kids study such subjects as necroeconomics while being tormented by desire for material possessions. Egged on by Rapacia's Vice Principal of Darkness – a giant tin Easter bunny named the Grabbit, whose hollow voice speaks in diabolically cute limericks – Marlo begins to plan the heist of all eternity.

Book Review: “Doughnut” by Tom Holt
Book Reviews / January 13, 2018

From a grand design that challenges you to reconsider the order of cause and effect, to sentences like "If Time is a piece of cheese, the two seconds that followed were fondue," this book makes you think, then laugh, then grip your armrests with concern and excitement, over and over until its cleverly satisfying ending.

Book Review: “Every Seventh Wave” by Daniel Glattauer
Book Reviews / January 13, 2018

It all started innocently: an email sent to the wrong address, an "I" before an "E" where it shouldn't have been. What followed was a friendship, then romance of sorts. This is the follow-up book to "Love Virtually", in which Emmi Rothner mistakenly emails Leo Leike and things take off from there.