Book review: “Tom Trueheart and the Land of Dark Stories” by Ian Beck
Book Reviews / July 23, 2013

In the sequel to “The Secret History of Tom Trueheart”, the youngest of seven brothers in the last surviving family of storybook heroes must, once again, set out to save the older six. Not only that, but he must rescue five princesses who were spirited away on their wedding day before the helpless, horrified eyes of their wedding guests. Also, he has to stop a renegade Story Bureau scribe, now styling himself the King of Unhappy Endings, from marching an Army of Darkness against the Land of Stories.

Book review: “Storybound” by Marissa Burt
Book Reviews / July 20, 2013

Una Fairchild is a lonely little girl from our world who, one day, finds a book in the library purporting to be the Story of Una Fairchild. Even more amazingly, the book’s blank pages begin filling with text before her eyes, as though she were part of a story being written down as it happens in real time. Before she has a moment to stop and consider what is going on, she finds herself really inside the story—or rather in Story—gate-crashing two students’ practical exam in heroics.

Book review: “Cold Days” by Jim Butcher
Book Reviews / June 23, 2013

Book 14 of “The Dresden Files” follows up on Chicago-based wizard/detective Harry Dresden’s apparent death in “Changes” and post-death experiences in “Ghost Story”. If you haven’t read those books yet, I’ve already spoiled that much; to say anything about this book, I’ll have to spoil a lot more.

Book review: “Flora’s Dare” by Ysabeau S. Wilce
Book Reviews / May 24, 2013

In the sequel to “Flora Segunda”, Flora Fyrdraaca ov Fyrdraaca, fourteen-year-old heroine of an alternate-history version of San Francisco called Califa, finds out what her true name is. And while I’m mentioning it, I might add that the full title of this book is “Flora’s Dare: How a Girl of Spirit Gambles All to Expand Her Vocabulary, Confront a Bouncing Boy Terror, and Try to Save Califa from a Shaky Doom (Despite Being Confined to Her Room).”

Book review: “The Secret History of Tom Trueheart” by Ian Beck
Book Reviews / May 20, 2013

Young Tom comes from a line of storybook heroes. And by that I mean the actual heroes of such stories as “Jack the Giant Killer” and “The Frog Prince.” Whether a clever tailor or a charming prince, the hero in each of your favorite fairy tales was most likely a member of the Trueheart clan, acting on instructions from the staff at the Story Bureau, and with a little help from sprites who carry messages and throw in a little magic now and then.

Book review: “Princeps’ Fury” by Jim Butcher
Book Reviews / May 19, 2013

In Book 5 of the “Codex Alera” series, young Tavi of Calderon, recently outed as Gaius Octavian—the grandson of Alera’s ruling First Lord Gaius Sextus, and thereby Princeps of the realm—faces a crisis in which the antagonistic races that populate his world must either come together or perish separately. At the same time, the question of who will succeed Gaius Sextus reaches a crucial climax that will only be resolved in Book 6, “First Lord’s Fury.”

Book review: “Captain’s Fury” by Jim Butcher
Book Reviews / April 8, 2013

Now, two years later, “Captain’s Fury” picks up the plot-line just in time for Tavi to be relieved from his command and move beyond his role as captain. And though Book 5 is titled “Princeps’ Fury”, it is in this book that Tavi is first recognized as the Princeps—i.e., the First Lord’s grandson and heir, rightly named Gaius Octavian. If I just surprised you, you’ve missed a lot and should go back to “Cursor’s Fury” before reading any further. Spoilers ahead!

Book review: “Tanglewood Tales” by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Book Reviews / February 11, 2013

And yet I would bet you’re hearing about this book for the first time now. Here some writers would say, “So goes the world,” and let it be. But I say it need not be so. Nathaniel Hawthorne is too important a figure in American literature to be allowed to remain only a figure, silhouetted against the dying light of a bygone age. His writing really is enjoyable, and some of it was designed for the enjoyment of kids. And even though kids’ tastes may change, there still remains a good deal of charm and appeal in Hawthorne’s retellings of the world’s most timeless tales.

Book review: “Perloo the Bold” by Avi
Book Reviews / January 29, 2013

The author of “Tales from Dimwood Forest” brings us this intriguing fantasy novel for the young. Two tribes have been at war, on and off, as far back as history remembers: the rabbit-like Montmers and the coyote-like Felbarts. Among the few Montmers who know anything about this history, is bookish, shy Perloo. But when the old Granter of the Montmers is on her deathbed, she decides to elevate Perloo to be her successor…instead of her ambitious son Berwig.