Tag Archives: humor

Book Review: Once Upon Stilettos by Shanna Swendson

Stilettos

It’s been quite a few years since I read Enchanted, Inc. because, frankly, I’m a guy and chick lit isn’t my thing. But it was such a funny and magical book that continuing with the series has often been on my mind. And now I find that the Katie Chandler series has grown to seven books. Based on the adventures of a Texas belle who finds adventure, romance, and professional fulfillment in New York, it ... Read More »

Book Review: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang by Ian Fleming

ChittyBang

We’ve run into this problem before: First it was a novel. Then it was adapted, more successfully than faithfully, into a movie. Then came a film novelization, a novel designed to be more faithful to the movie than the movie was to the original novel. They did it to Pierre Boulle’s Planet of the Apes. More recently, it happened to Cressida Cowell’s How to Train Your Dragon. It even happened to another book by Ian ... Read More »

Book Review: Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes

Quixote

Everyone who meets Don Quixote is amazed that one and the same person can be so wise and well-spoken regarding most things, and so completely insane when it comes to chivalry and the deeds of knight-errantry. Really a sensible old country gentleman, he has had his head turned by “books of chivalry”—romances about the apocryphal acts of apocryphal knights, their quests and amours, their saintly virtues and their military exploits. At times it seems possible ... Read More »

11 Problems Only Sidekicks Will Understand

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part I

#sidekickproblems Read More »

Book Review: Right Ho, Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse

RightHo

The Jeeves novels are one of the few series of books I have chosen to enjoy without any regard to canon order or the order of publication. Wikipedia has a nice list of the books it comprises, if you’re interested. I’m interested, but only so far as making sure that I don’t miss any of them. Nothing brightens my outlook on the world after a nutritious diet of serious books on CD, quite like listening ... Read More »

Book Review: Cosmic by Frank Cottrell Boyce

Cosmic

Two twelve-year-olds from Waterloo, U.K. (near Liverpool) tell their parents they are going to the Lake District for a school camp, when in fact they are going to the moon. Kids these days! It’s only the latest prank pulled by young Liam, who has made a study of ways to get in trouble by being tall for his age and stubbly-chinned. When adults mistake him for one of them because of his height and mature ... Read More »

Book Review: Scumble by Ingrid Law

Scumble

In her debut novel Savvy, Ingrid Law introduced us to the big, unconventional Beaumont family, in which each child manifests a unique super-power (called a “savvy”) on his or her thirteenth birthday. The challenge is to recognize what that savvy is and scumble it, or figure out how to control it, before something big happens. Otherwise people could get hurt; or, even worse, outsiders might find out about the family’s secret. In this sequel, we ... Read More »

Book Review: Timeless by Gail Carriger

Timeless

The fifth and final book of “The Parasol Protectorate” confronts Lady Alexia Maccon, née Tarabotti, and her team of supernatural sleuths, with a mystery that reaches back into ancient Egypt. Intertwined with this mystery are a present-day murder case, a dark secret that threatens to break up the pack of werewolves led by Alexia’s Alpha husband, and the lingering puzzle of the father she never knew. And so a racy, funny series of romantic whodunits, ... Read More »

Book Review: Geek Fantasy Novel by E. Archer

Geek

Ralph is a geek, but not the type who would ordinarily dream of becoming the hero in a fantasy novel. In fact, Ralph’s boring parents have done their best to instill in him a flat, unheroic, unimaginative character. Their reason is that it is dangerous for members of their family to make wishes. The closest thing to a wish that has ever crossed Ralph’s mind is his dream of being a computer game designer. I ... Read More »

Book Review: Heartless by Gail Carriger

Heartless

It’s the fourth book of The Parasol Protectorate, and only the first time that phrase is mentioned in the series. Also known as Alexia Tarabotti novels (though she’s been Lady Maccon since her marriage), they relate the racy, dangerous adventures of a soulless, or preternatural, lady in a steampunk version of Victorian England. Being preternatural means she can turn vampires and werewolves mortal with a touch; she can even exorcise ghosts. Being the wife of ... Read More »