Book Review: “Made for You” by Melissa Marr
Book Reviews / October 4, 2014

“Made for You” reminded me why I avoid psychological thrillers. Long story short: I’m a wuss, and “Made for You” gave me the chills. Which is great because Melissa Marr did achieve her goal as writer, but also, yeah, I’ll be double-checking my door is locked tonight.

Book Review: “Rebel Belle” by Rachel Hawkins
Book Reviews / July 4, 2014

This book was quirky, cute and fun. I wouldn’t expect anything less after reading Hawkin’s Hex Hall trilogy, which I also adore. Playing like an episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer (in more than one way), Rebel Belle is fast-paced and action-packed.

Book Review: “Dorothy Must Die” by Danielle Paige
Book Reviews / May 8, 2014

‘Dorothy Must Die’ is the first book in a trilogy centered around the malevolent Dorothy, who after finding herself back in Oz again, took control of the magical land by teaming with the secretly wicked Glinda, and bewitching Oz’s true ruler Ozma…

Book review: Secret by Brigid Kemmerer
Book Reviews / February 3, 2014

EARTH. FIRE. AIR. WATER. Nick Merrick is stretched to breaking point. He’s trying to keep his grades sky-high or he won’t get in to college. He’s trying to keep his brother’s business afloat or the Merricks will be out on the street. He’s trying to keep the secret of where he’s going in the evenings from his twin brother Gabriel – or he fears he’ll lose his family. And he’s trying to keep his mind off the hot, self-assured dancer who is his ‘girlfriend’s’ partner.

Book review: “Maggot Moon” by Sally Gardner
Book Reviews / February 23, 2013

Standish Treadwill sees the world differently, through his one blue eye and one brown, the letters dancing around in a dyslexic swirl. Yet it is his steadfast Gramps and his wonderful friend Hector who encourage him to continue fighting for all that makes him different. Against the backdrop of the harsh regime of the Motherland, with the help of a small band of rebels, Standish observes and questions and refuses to let the Greenflies stop him. And what exactly is going on with that moon landing propaganda?

Book review: “Noughts and Cross” by Malorie Blackman
Book Reviews / February 12, 2013

Critically acclaimed author, Malorie Blackman, tackles issues of race in this reversing of segregation in an alternate dystopian landscape of England in the 1960s. Persephone (Sephy) Hadley is a dark-skinned Cross and daughter of a successful politician. Her childhood friend, Callum, is a Nought with light skin, and his Mother is a former employee of the Hadleys as Sephy’s Nanny. When tensions rise, secrets are revealed, and Callum’s Mother Meggie is fired from her position in the household, the friends struggle to maintain their relationship despite the harsh judgement of those who cannot understand their connection.

Book review: “Eve” by Anna Carey
Book Reviews / January 24, 2013

In 2032, after a devastating bout of world-wide disease we meet Eve, a best friend, an orphan, a school valedictorian and a survivor. Dubbed one of the brightest students since the 21st century plague demolished the majority of earth’s human population, Eve is expected to do great things once she graduates. However these great things are only defined as “trades”. Until one becomes an actual 12th year graduate, true life after school remains a mystery. As a female student in 2032, throughout her whole life Eve’s been taught and warned away from the wicked, manipulative and deadly ways of the male species.

Book review: “Hemlock” by Kathleen Peacock
Book Reviews / January 24, 2013

In a literary world where the vast majority of werewolf stories fall into the “been there done that” category, “Hemlock” doesn’t merely shine, it supernovas! Dark, creative, and emotional; “Hemlock” raises the bar on all accounts. Solid world building and multifaceted characters pair with a unique take on werewolves to create not only a highly addicting book, but also a new personal favorite of mine.