The danger for a mortal girl in the High Court of Faerie is very real, even if she is playing puppet-master with the High King. Jude only has a year and a day to convince Cardan to stay on the throne and protect her brother Oak until he is ready to rule. Will Cardan agree? Check out our review of Holly Black's newest book in The Folk of the Air series, The Wicked King.

In this sequel to Ash Princess, Laura Sebastian takes the reader on an exciting and fast-paced journey through new kingdoms and new magic as Theo works to regain her kingdom.

Things are going really well for Rukhsana – graduation is coming up, she just got a full scholarship to Caltech, and she’s totally in love with her beautiful girlfriend, Ariana. The only hiccup is that she hasn’t told her parents she’s gay.

The wait is over for the sequel to Garth Nix and Sean Williams’ Have Sword, Will Travel! This Nordic saga picks up right where the first book left off, with Odo and Eleanor rushing toward the village green to save their neighbors from an unexpected Bilewolf attack.

Min, a 13-year-old fox spirit who – like the rest of her family – usually takes human form, dreams of joining the Space Forces like her older brother, Jun. But when a special investigator arrives at Min’s home and informs her family that Jun has deserted, Min knows that something is terribly wrong.

Fans of the podcast Welcome to Night Vale – and its associated tie-in novels – will be excited to learn that cocreator Joseph Fink has recently published another Night Vale–adjacent novel: Alice Isn’t Dead.

At long last, Bloodwitch, by Susan Dennard, is almost here! And Witchlanders can rejoice because this third installment in the Witchlands series brings all the magic and excitement we’ve been hoping for!

In this sequel to Exo, hardened soldier Donovan Reyes tries to adjust back to his regimented military lifestyle after his run-in with insurgent group Sapience a few months ago. Unfortunately, he won't get much time to reflect – not only is Sapience ramping up its terrorist activities, but zhree communications with the home planet have taken a dark turn.

One of the most interesting and remarkable books I have ever read, The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein follows a young woman as she tries to tame two monsters: one, her lover; and the other? Herself.

Bronte Mettlestone has just learned her parents have been killed by pirates. Since she hasn’t seen them since she was a baby, this news isn’t as devastating as one might expect, but it is rather... inconvenient, especially since they’ve left her a set of faery cross-stitched instructions to carry out.

Book Review: The Fortune of War by Patrick O’Brian
Book Reviews / July 15, 2005

The sixth of twenty completed novels about a 19th-century Royal Navy captain named Jack Aubrey and his faithful ship’s surgeon, Stephen Maturin, is unusual in many ways. For example, in this book Aubrey is never in command of anything larger than a rowboat. As O’Brian explains in the preface, the book dramatizes actual events in naval history, inserting his fictional characters into the action. Yet even though they don'’t displa…

Book Review: Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Book Reviews / July 8, 2005

The book that started not one but two celebrated series of science fiction novels started, in turn, as a story in Analog Magazine, which my father used to get when I was a kid, so it was always lying around. First published in 1977, it is eerily predictive of some developments such as e-mail and the internet...but mostly, it is a far-out fantasy that inhabits its own unique, somewhat futuristic world.

Book Review: The Supernaturalist by Eoin Colfer
Book Reviews / July 8, 2005

In the near future, a place called Satellite City has become the urban nightmare du jour. Everything, including the steering of individual cars, is controlled by a privately-owned satellite hanging low in the sky over town. City police, private police, and armed-and- dangerous squads of lawyers patrol the city, and “no-sponsor” orphans like Cosmo Hill are locked up in a maximum security “institute for parentally challenged boys”…

Book Review: Desolation Island by Patrick O’Brian
Book Reviews / July 8, 2005

Fifth in the series of historical novels that started with Master and Commander, this book continues the adventures of the big, jolly Royal Navy Captain Jack Aubrey and his small, melancholy friend and ship’s surgeon, Stephen Maturin. And though the mission in this book is an enormous test of Jack’s seamanship, leadership, and heroism, it is—more than the previous books in the series—really Stephen’s adventure, for the most part.

Book Review: The Mauritius Command by Patrick O’Brian
Book Reviews / July 8, 2005

This is the fourth novel of the twenty-book series about the Napoleonic-era exploits of British naval captain “Lucky” Jack Aubrey and his friend, surgeon, and intelligence officer, Stephen Maturin. Or rather, as one reader wrote to me, it is the fourth part of one huge, wandering novel in twenty parts.

Book Review: The Door in the Hedge by Robin McKinley
Book Reviews / July 5, 2005

The Newbery-Medal winning author of many novel-length books of fantasy, for youth and adults, as well as “fairy tale novelizations” like Spindle’s End, has struck again with this collection of four fairy tales elaborated with warmth, sensitivity, and compelling characters, and interesting new twists. In “The Stolen Princess,” we learn what happens in the last kingdom before the borders of Fairyland (or Faerie Land), where newbor…

Book Review: Magic Kingdom For Sale–Sold!
Book Reviews / June 22, 2005

The author of the acclaimed fantasy novels Running with the Demon and A Knight of the Word, as well as the best-selling Shannara series, is one of the authors most often recommended by your feedback. I have been hesitant to follow this recommendation, for two main reasons. First, it sounds like he’s already popular enough without my help. And second, he has written a lot of thickish books and, believe it or not, I’m a slow reade…

Book Review: The Princess and Curdie by George MacDonald
Book Reviews / June 22, 2005

The sequel to The Princess and the Goblin begins with a taste of the sort of disappointment that, in real-life stories, often follows the “happily ever after” ending. Curdie, the miner’s son, no longer has the Princess Irene to protect or the goblins and their bizarre creatures to fight against. He doesn'’t whistle or sing any more, he no longer spends much time looking at beautiful animals and plants, he is not such a good son …