The danger for a mortal girl in the High Court of Faerie is very real, even if she is playing puppet-master with the High King. Jude only has a year and a day to convince Cardan to stay on the throne and protect her brother Oak until he is ready to rule. Will Cardan agree? Check out our review of Holly Black's newest book in The Folk of the Air series, The Wicked King.

In this sequel to Ash Princess, Laura Sebastian takes the reader on an exciting and fast-paced journey through new kingdoms and new magic as Theo works to regain her kingdom.

Things are going really well for Rukhsana – graduation is coming up, she just got a full scholarship to Caltech, and she’s totally in love with her beautiful girlfriend, Ariana. The only hiccup is that she hasn’t told her parents she’s gay.

The wait is over for the sequel to Garth Nix and Sean Williams’ Have Sword, Will Travel! This Nordic saga picks up right where the first book left off, with Odo and Eleanor rushing toward the village green to save their neighbors from an unexpected Bilewolf attack.

Min, a 13-year-old fox spirit who – like the rest of her family – usually takes human form, dreams of joining the Space Forces like her older brother, Jun. But when a special investigator arrives at Min’s home and informs her family that Jun has deserted, Min knows that something is terribly wrong.

Fans of the podcast Welcome to Night Vale – and its associated tie-in novels – will be excited to learn that cocreator Joseph Fink has recently published another Night Vale–adjacent novel: Alice Isn’t Dead.

At long last, Bloodwitch, by Susan Dennard, is almost here! And Witchlanders can rejoice because this third installment in the Witchlands series brings all the magic and excitement we’ve been hoping for!

In this sequel to Exo, hardened soldier Donovan Reyes tries to adjust back to his regimented military lifestyle after his run-in with insurgent group Sapience a few months ago. Unfortunately, he won't get much time to reflect – not only is Sapience ramping up its terrorist activities, but zhree communications with the home planet have taken a dark turn.

One of the most interesting and remarkable books I have ever read, The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein follows a young woman as she tries to tame two monsters: one, her lover; and the other? Herself.

Bronte Mettlestone has just learned her parents have been killed by pirates. Since she hasn’t seen them since she was a baby, this news isn’t as devastating as one might expect, but it is rather... inconvenient, especially since they’ve left her a set of faery cross-stitched instructions to carry out.

Book Review: The Holy Bible by miscellaneous authors
Book Reviews / November 9, 2004

There are several good reasons not to include a review of "the Good Book" on the Book Trolley. First, MuggleNet does not sponsor any particular religion, and my views about the Bible are not necessarily the views of MuggleNet, its webmaster, its editors, or its devoted readers. I'm sure they have no intention of letting this site be used for religious propaganda. Second, it might seem beneath the dignity of the Bible, to those o…

Book Review: Sour Land by William H. Armstrong
Book Reviews / October 20, 2004

This is a companion book to Sounder, and in my opinion, an even more moving book. Perhaps its power lies in its personal, intimate nature. Unlike Sounder, this book is full of characters with lifelike names. It does not come across as a universal parable—though it may be that—but as a portrait of a handful of very specific, individual people. People who are bound together by loss and by love, by hard work and the enjoyment of st…

Book Review: Sounder by William H. Armstrong
Book Reviews / October 20, 2004

This is a still, gentle story about loss, waiting, and searching, set in the Southern U. S. around the turn of the 20th century. It mostly concerns a family circle--particularly the mother, father, and oldest boy--and their coon dog, Sounder. Touched by tragedy and racial injustice, it puts a high value on hope, on the love of nature, and on the love of words.

Book Review: Peter Pan and Wendy by J. M. Barrie
Book Reviews / October 20, 2004

Written in 1906 to benefit a London children's hospital, this classic has gone through such a wringer of stage, film, and animated adaptations, not to mention picture-book retellings, that reading or hearing the original text is now somewhat unusual; but not nearly as unusual as the story itself, which is by turns witty and bizarre and melancholy and gruesome, and always narrated in a uniquely teasing way.

Book Review: Ramona and Her Father by Beverly Cleary
Book Reviews / October 20, 2004

Second-grader Ramona Quimby is distressed when her father loses his job. This brings changes in her family, which includes an older sister "Beezus" (given name Beatrice) who is going through that "difficult age," a cat who snubs cheap cat food, and a mother who has to work so hard to support the family that she doesn't have time to do things like sewing a sheep costume for the Christmas program. But what worries Ramona most is h…

Book Review: Dicey’s Song by Cynthia Voigt
Book Reviews / October 12, 2004

Dicey is the oldest of four siblings who are in the process of being adopted by their grandmother, after being abandoned by their mentally ill mother, and making their way alone from Boston to Eastern Maryland. Now that school has started and a little normalcy has come into their lives, they should live happily ever after, right?