To prove her worthiness as the next Sea Queen, Lira must take the heart of a human prince. Her reputation as the Prince's Bane will do her no good on this quest, as a curse turns Lira into a pesky human, and she must find a way to steal her prince's heart without her Siren's song.

In The Raven's Tale, Cat Winters writes a heady study of Edgar Allen Poe that is thoughtful, entertaining, and inspiring. 

With beautiful, full-color illustrations, this Inspired Traveller's Guide takes you on a journey of famous places across the globe that inspired great works of fiction.

Having just turned 18, Rasmira is ready to pass her trial and prove her worthiness as her father's chosen heir and the next leader of their village. But something goes wrong during the trial, and the only hope for Rasmira is to do the impossible – can she kill a god and earn her way back from the wild?

Tosh Livingston has just arrived as a freshman at Harvard University. He hopes more than anything that college will be a chance for a fresh start. But as one of the only black students among a crowd of hyper-privileged Harvard legacies, Tosh soon realizes his fresh start may be harder to achieve than he thought.

Clark Kent desperately doesn’t want his powers to be discovered, but when an acquaintance at school clues him in to the fact that men from Smallville’s immigrant population are going missing, he knows he has to step in.

Spin the Dawn is an epic journey with a smart, creative heroine and an adorable love story at its center.

You have to love a series whose entire premise is laid out in its title: This graphic novel series follows the adventures of a teenage Cleopatra (“Cleo”) who has traveled through time and is now involved in an intergalactic conflict with Xaius Octavian – once Cleo’s best friend and now her arch nemesis.

Head to the island of Bellona to worship the Sun, make some Offerings, and learn more about why the Night might actually be the right choice.

Travel to space with Emi and experience a new science fiction story through an app on your smartphone.

Book Review: Five Children and It by E. Nesbit
Book Reviews / April 5, 2005

E is short for Edith, a British-authoress of magical stories for children who also happened to be an outspoken feminist and socialist in her time (late 19th century, early 20th). This one is regarded as her masterpiece. It really is quite a lot of fun. It mostly has to do with four children, really, though from time to time their helpless baby brother also gets involved.

Book Review: The Red Fairy Book Editor Andrew Lang
Book Reviews / March 9, 2005

This was the second book of Lang’s historic collection of fairy tales from around the world. It is evident from the brief preface that Lang considered it an afterthought—not up to the standards of the Blue Fairy Book, but filled with good stories that readers would enjoy, even if they were not as well-known. Well, clearly, being well-known isn’t the only test of a great story. And just as clearly, some stories that were well-kno…

Book Review: Rules of the Road by Joan Bauer
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

From the author of Hope Was Here comes this acclaimed 1998 book about 16-year-old Jenna Boller, who knows a lot about selling shoes and a little about driving. On these qualifications she gets the unasked-for job of driving Mrs. Gladstone, the President of the shoe-store chain she works for, from Chicago to Dallas for the big shareholders' meeting. And though her mother isn't keen on letting Jenna go, the fact that her alcoholic…

Book Review: Max the Mighty by Rodman Philbrick
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

This is the sequel to Freak the Mighty, featuring the surviving half of that tragic duo. Maxwell Kane is still big and strong, a loner living in his grandparents' basement, and generally thought of as stupid; but at least, thanks to his late friend Kevin, he can read, and he no longer worries much about his father, aptly nicknamed "Killer Kane," coming to get him.

Book Review: Spindle’s End by Robin McKinley
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

Newbery medal-winning author Robin McKinley is well-known for her novel-length adaptations of fairy tales, such as Deerskin, Beauty, and Rose Daughter. This wonderful fantasy book is her version of "The Sleeping Beauty."

Book Review: Gold Unicorn by Tanith Lee
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

The sequel to Black Unicorn finds young sorceress Tanaquil--whose gift is mending things--nearing the end of her travels to see her world, accompanied by a very patient camel and her adorable, talking pet peeve. As she turns toward home, toward the castle of her eccentric mother, Tanaquil strays into the path of a conquering horde--an army bent on subduing the entire world--and the icy young Empress who believes she is bringing …

Book Review: Black Unicorn by Tanith Lee
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

Tanaquil is a red-headed girl from a long line of red-headed sorceresses. But to her mother's vast disappointment, Tanaquil is no sorceress. Not that Tanaquil is any happier with her lot, cooped up in a castle reeking with unruly magic, with only guards and servants for company, and a desert all around that burns by day and freezes by night. The only thing she has going for her is a talent for fixing things.

Book Review: Deerskin by Robin McKinley
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

From the award-winning author of several novel-sized fantasies featuring strong, romantic heroines, comes this adaptation of an R-rated Perrault fairy tale that was originally called "Donkeyskin."

Book Review: The Blue Sword by Robin McKinley
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

This Newbery Honor book is the first in a series of novels about the fantasy realm of Damar, which also includes the Newbery Medal-winning The Hero and the Crown. And Potterheads will be amazed to learn that this book contains both a Harry and a Draco. Only Draco, in this case, is a horse; and Harry is a girl.

Book Review: The Orange Fairy Book Editor Andrew Lang
Book Reviews / January 28, 2005

Mr. Lang’s prefaces to his twelve “fairy books of many colours” are often very informative, particularly about what makes fairy stories so important, and how to answer the objections of their critics. The preface to the Orange Fairy Book is no exception. Here Mr. Lang introduces 33 stories from a variety of cultures and traditions, admitting that some of the more “cruel and savage deeds” from the original stories had to be toned…