This month's Author Takeover comes from Robin Talley, whose new YA novel, PULP, examines how the power of storytelling can connect two young women learning about their sexuality and the world around them across the generations. In her Author Takeover, Robin was keen to examine Crimes of Grindelwald and the pitfalls that have befallen the Potterverse in making sure LGBTQ+ people are visible in the wizarding world.

It's almost Halloween and the perfect time to snuggle up with a dark and twisty YA series. This month's Author Takeover, from Kendare Blake, is the perfect introduction to the Three Dark Crowns series. Read which House Kendare associates with her fantasy world's mysterious powers, and figure out your allegiance to the crown.

Our September Author Takeover comes from debut author Anna James, whose dazzling new middle-grade adventure book, Pages & Co: Tilly and the Bookwanderers, is out this month. Anna explores the bookish wonders of Harry Potter and how her own favorite library spots have lent themselves to her imagination.

Our Author Takeover today comes from Chloe Seager, with a missing scene from her new hilarious and relatable UK YA book in the Editing Emma series. Like any Potterhead, Chloe is no stranger to thinking about Hogwarts Houses. Find out whom of her characters Chloe would sort into which House, and why.

We are delighted to reveal the stunning UK cover of a brand new YA contemporary fantasy by debut author Christine Lynn Herman. The Devouring Gray follows four teens who have the power to protect their town from a monster – if their families' dark secrets don't devour them first. It's the perfect read for Potterheads who love a bit of mystery with their monsters.

In our July Author Takeover, we're joined by Simon James Green, whose hilarious Noah Can't Even sequel, Noah Could Never, is out now in the UK. With parallels to Goblet of Fire and Harry's encounters with Beauxbatons and Durmstrang students, Simon examines the perils of expectations and stereotypes. Of course, there are lots of laughs along the way while Noah figures it out.

Joining us for an Author Takeover today is author and Potterhead Sara Holland, whose fantastic young adult novel Everless is out now. Much like our beloved Potter series, Everless tackles the trouble with becoming obsessed with living forever, and the unfortunate imbalance this creates when it comes to power. Sara joins us today to ask if it's worth it.

Our second Author Takeover for May is from YA author Alice Oseman, whose incredible third novel, I Was Born For This, was published in the UK earlier this month. An absolute must-read for everyone who has ever been involved in fandom, Alice's novel has a particularly insightful exploration of the light and dark side of shipping, something the Potter fandom knows all about.

Welcome to our Author Takeover for May, with a guest post from Lucy Christopher. Her new YA novel, Storm-Wake, is a modern reimagining of The Tempest. It is a spellbinding tale of transformation and illusion that moves between the realms of dream and reality. Lucy discusses elemental magic and how the stormy island setting lends itself to find magic in the minutiae.

We are joined by debut author Sophie Cameron to celebrate her wonderful new young adult novel Out of the Blue. Set against the backdrop of the frenzied Edinburgh Festival, Out of the Blue is the story of grief, love, and learning to live on. Supported by a group of new friends, Sophie's main character, Jaya, finds her feet, even when angels are falling from the sky.

Book Review: Runaway Ralph by Beverly Cleary
Book Reviews / September 11, 2004

The sequel to The Mouse and the Motorcycle finds Ralph the mouse growing discontented in his hotel lobby home. His younger brothers, sisters, and cousins keep pestering him to let them ride his toy motorcycle, and his mother and uncle won’t leave him alone. Finally Ralph decides to runaway to a camp whose bugle calls he can hear every morning and evening.

Book Review: Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary
Book Reviews / September 11, 2004

I should have read this book 20 years ago. This story about a lonely boy, learning to live with his parents’ divorce, going to a new school where he has no friends, and making his first efforts as a writer, won the Newbery Medal in 1984--the year my parents split up. In lots of ways, it’s like reading the story of my life; but obviously it isn’t about me, and the poignancy of the story isn’t just in my head, or it wouldn’t have …

Book Review: Till We Have Faces by C. S. Lewis
Book Reviews / September 3, 2004

I know a Christian man--I am not sure I would call him a good Christian man, but I won’t deny that he is a sincere one--who raised his sons forbidding them to own or read books about magic, mythology, or science fiction. He was so strict about it that when one of his sons (who rather liked sci-fi and fantasy) went out of town for the summer, he raided the boy’s bedroom and threw out all his books. The same son later turned down …

Book Review: Green Boy by Susan Cooper
Book Reviews / September 3, 2004

Trey is very protective of his sensitive, mute little brother, Lou. They live with their grandparents on an outer island of the Bahamas, from which they often cross to an uninhabited isle to look at shells, birds, and fish. But now Long Pond Cay is threatened by powerful developers who want to build a hotel and casino on the spot and spoil all the beauty and life that is there.

Book Review: …and now Miguel by Joseph Krumgold
Book Reviews / September 3, 2004

This book is the winner of the 1954 Newbery medal which, along with Onion John, makes its author one of the few two-time winners of the American Library Association’s highest honor for children’s literature. Like many of its fellow medalists, this story is set in a culture that is different from most American readers. This probably has less to do with the hispanic background of its characters and more to do with the culture of s…

The Hitchhiker’s Guide and Dirk Gently Series by Douglas Adams
Book Reviews / August 4, 2004

It took me a long time to catch on to this series of cult favorites. The first time I was aware of it was when I knew a couple of weird guys in high school who treated these philosophical, sci-fi spoof novels as their religious scriptures. That kind of turned me off. Then I got hold of the books in college and had such a good time reading them, my roommate thought I was weird. I actually fell out of my chair laughing.

Book Review: Lost in a Good Book by Jasper Fforde
Book Reviews / September 4, 2003

This second of the “Thursday Next” adventures that began with The Eyre Affair is exciting, funny and mentally engaging. A romp in an alternative-1985 England, where there are no airplanes and Germany did not lose in World War II; while on the other hand time travel, undead problems, and resequenced mammoths, dodos and Neanderthals are part of every-day life. Everyone is nuts about literature, a whole category of crimes has grown…