Our second Author Takeover for May is from YA author Alice Oseman, whose incredible third novel, I Was Born For This, was published in the UK earlier this month. An absolute must-read for everyone who has ever been involved in fandom, Alice's novel has a particularly insightful exploration of the light and dark side of shipping, something the Potter fandom knows all about.

Welcome to our Author Takeover for May, with a guest post from Lucy Christopher. Her new YA novel, Storm-Wake, is a modern reimagining of The Tempest. It is a spellbinding tale of transformation and illusion that moves between the realms of dream and reality. Lucy discusses elemental magic and how the stormy island setting lends itself to find magic in the minutiae.

We are joined by debut author Sophie Cameron to celebrate her wonderful new young adult novel Out of the Blue. Set against the backdrop of the frenzied Edinburgh Festival, Out of the Blue is the story of grief, love, and learning to live on. Supported by a group of new friends, Sophie's main character, Jaya, finds her feet, even when angels are falling from the sky.

Our March Author Takeover comes from Akemi Dawn Bowman, author of "Starfish", which is publishing in the UK next month. Her stunning debut novel examines social anxiety, toxic relationships, rejection, and the importance of being true to yourself. Today Akemi looks at the similarities between Harry and her main character, Kiko, and the paths they tread.

In our first Author Takeover of 2018, we are joined by the New York Times–bestselling author of How to Hang a Witch, Adriana Mather. A spellbinding story of witchcraft, ghosts, and a destructive age-old curse, How to Hang a Witch was partially inspired by Adriana's own family history.

This month's Author Takeover comes from a "Harry Potter" superfan, author Annabel Pitcher. Her new teen novella, "The Last Days of Archie Maxwell", explores the aftermath of secrets revealed. Published by dyslexia-friendly publisher Barrington Stoke, Archie's story is a heartfelt and accessible story exploring the boundaries of love – particularly upon realizing a parental figure may not be all that they seem.

Mostly cast as the villain, often without rhyme or reason as to why, witches have always seemed so mysterious. They are the opposite of damsels in distress, Sleeping Beautys, Cinderellas, Snow Whites. They are mistresses of their own fortunes. They have the power to change lives – their own and others’. They have magic.

Our Author Takeover this month is dedicated to everyone headed to university/college this autumn/fall! It comes from Brit authors Lucy and Tom, whose novel "Freshers" is all about that first transitional year. In particular, the benefits of fandom and clubs for finding your people.

Our Author Takeover for July comes from Aisha Bushby, a debut author and Potterhead whose short story "Marionette Girl" is published next month in "A Change Is Gonna Come" from Stripes. #ChangeBook is an anthology of stories and poetry from BAME writers on the theme of change.

Our May Author Takeover is by Cat Clarke, whose latest YA novel, "Girlhood", is a darkly compulsive story about love, death, and growing up under the shadow of grief. Set in a boarding school in Scotland, the familiar halls are the perfect place for "Potter" fans to escape to in this compulsive, addictive read. Yet there are some sinister secrets that threaten to tear friendships apart.

Book Review: Jacob Have I Loved by Katherine Paterson
Book Reviews / May 4, 2005

The 1981 winner of the Newbery Medal takes its title from a Bible verse that says: “Jacob have I loved, but Esau I hated.” Like the twins of Biblical lore, there is a bitter rivalry between Caroline and Sara Louise——at least, there is in Louise'’s mind. As the nation goes through the anguish of World War II, she is having a rough time of her own.

Book Review: The Witches by Roald Dahl
Book Reviews / April 5, 2005

A little orphan boy, being raised by his cigar-chomping Norwegian grandmother, comes to an English resort hotel for a seaside cure. While he is training his pet mice (William and Mary) to do tricks, he makes the horrifying discovery that all his Grandma's stories about witches are true. They really do have square, toeless feet, pointy teeth, claws on their fingers, and eyes that glow purple, and they think children smell like do…

Book Review: Five Children and It by E. Nesbit
Book Reviews / April 5, 2005

E is short for Edith, a British-authoress of magical stories for children who also happened to be an outspoken feminist and socialist in her time (late 19th century, early 20th). This one is regarded as her masterpiece. It really is quite a lot of fun. It mostly has to do with four children, really, though from time to time their helpless baby brother also gets involved.

Book Review: The Red Fairy Book Editor Andrew Lang
Book Reviews / March 9, 2005

This was the second book of Lang’s historic collection of fairy tales from around the world. It is evident from the brief preface that Lang considered it an afterthought—not up to the standards of the Blue Fairy Book, but filled with good stories that readers would enjoy, even if they were not as well-known. Well, clearly, being well-known isn’t the only test of a great story. And just as clearly, some stories that were well-kno…

Book Review: Rules of the Road by Joan Bauer
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

From the author of Hope Was Here comes this acclaimed 1998 book about 16-year-old Jenna Boller, who knows a lot about selling shoes and a little about driving. On these qualifications she gets the unasked-for job of driving Mrs. Gladstone, the President of the shoe-store chain she works for, from Chicago to Dallas for the big shareholders' meeting. And though her mother isn't keen on letting Jenna go, the fact that her alcoholic…

Book Review: Max the Mighty by Rodman Philbrick
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

This is the sequel to Freak the Mighty, featuring the surviving half of that tragic duo. Maxwell Kane is still big and strong, a loner living in his grandparents' basement, and generally thought of as stupid; but at least, thanks to his late friend Kevin, he can read, and he no longer worries much about his father, aptly nicknamed "Killer Kane," coming to get him.

Book Review: Spindle’s End by Robin McKinley
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

Newbery medal-winning author Robin McKinley is well-known for her novel-length adaptations of fairy tales, such as Deerskin, Beauty, and Rose Daughter. This wonderful fantasy book is her version of "The Sleeping Beauty."

Book Review: Gold Unicorn by Tanith Lee
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

The sequel to Black Unicorn finds young sorceress Tanaquil--whose gift is mending things--nearing the end of her travels to see her world, accompanied by a very patient camel and her adorable, talking pet peeve. As she turns toward home, toward the castle of her eccentric mother, Tanaquil strays into the path of a conquering horde--an army bent on subduing the entire world--and the icy young Empress who believes she is bringing …

Book Review: Black Unicorn by Tanith Lee
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

Tanaquil is a red-headed girl from a long line of red-headed sorceresses. But to her mother's vast disappointment, Tanaquil is no sorceress. Not that Tanaquil is any happier with her lot, cooped up in a castle reeking with unruly magic, with only guards and servants for company, and a desert all around that burns by day and freezes by night. The only thing she has going for her is a talent for fixing things.

Book Review: Deerskin by Robin McKinley
Book Reviews / January 30, 2005

From the award-winning author of several novel-sized fantasies featuring strong, romantic heroines, comes this adaptation of an R-rated Perrault fairy tale that was originally called "Donkeyskin."