Travel to space with Emi! IGIST is a science fiction story that can be experienced through an app on your smartphone.

Since Max and Jordan travel in completely separate circles at school, the last thing they expect to do is to spend the summer working together in Jordan’s family food truck – but both boys soon discover that what they most need might be where they least expect it.

Follow Arik Meir, a hero for his time, from his youth in the 1970s through growing into a man and joining the Israeli military. This story is based on historical events and brings to life the tensions of love and war.

Rick Nagano is a Ph.D. student in history at USC, struggling to gain back the momentum he needs to finish his dissertation – let alone keep paying his rent on a graduate student stipend. So when an unusual job opportunity pops up to transcribe the journals of Mrs. W—, a vastly rich matriarch from one of LA’s oldest families, Rick jumps at the chance.

In this sequel to 2017’s NewsPrints, Blue and Hector are on their way to Altalus in pursuit of Crow – the boy designed to be a weapon but who doesn’t want to fight. Once in the capital, Blue and Hector quickly find themselves caught up in the turmoil of a decade-long war.

Young readers are sure to enjoy this riveting tale of magic, secrets, and monsters under the earth.

The danger for a mortal girl in the High Court of Faerie is very real, even if she is playing puppet-master with the High King. Jude only has a year and a day to convince Cardan to stay on the throne and protect her brother Oak until he is ready to rule. Will Cardan agree? Check out our review of Holly Black's newest book in The Folk of the Air series, The Wicked King.

In this sequel to Ash Princess, Laura Sebastian takes the reader on an exciting and fast-paced journey through new kingdoms and new magic as Theo works to regain her kingdom.

Things are going really well for Rukhsana – graduation is coming up, she just got a full scholarship to Caltech, and she’s totally in love with her beautiful girlfriend, Ariana. The only hiccup is that she hasn’t told her parents she’s gay.

The wait is over for the sequel to Garth Nix and Sean Williams’ Have Sword, Will Travel! This Nordic saga picks up right where the first book left off, with Odo and Eleanor rushing toward the village green to save their neighbors from an unexpected Bilewolf attack.

Book Review: Till We Have Faces by C. S. Lewis
Book Reviews / September 3, 2004

I know a Christian man--I am not sure I would call him a good Christian man, but I won’t deny that he is a sincere one--who raised his sons forbidding them to own or read books about magic, mythology, or science fiction. He was so strict about it that when one of his sons (who rather liked sci-fi and fantasy) went out of town for the summer, he raided the boy’s bedroom and threw out all his books. The same son later turned down …

Book Review: Green Boy by Susan Cooper
Book Reviews / September 3, 2004

Trey is very protective of his sensitive, mute little brother, Lou. They live with their grandparents on an outer island of the Bahamas, from which they often cross to an uninhabited isle to look at shells, birds, and fish. But now Long Pond Cay is threatened by powerful developers who want to build a hotel and casino on the spot and spoil all the beauty and life that is there.

Book Review: …and now Miguel by Joseph Krumgold
Book Reviews / September 3, 2004

This book is the winner of the 1954 Newbery medal which, along with Onion John, makes its author one of the few two-time winners of the American Library Association’s highest honor for children’s literature. Like many of its fellow medalists, this story is set in a culture that is different from most American readers. This probably has less to do with the hispanic background of its characters and more to do with the culture of s…

The Hitchhiker’s Guide and Dirk Gently Series by Douglas Adams
Book Reviews / August 4, 2004

It took me a long time to catch on to this series of cult favorites. The first time I was aware of it was when I knew a couple of weird guys in high school who treated these philosophical, sci-fi spoof novels as their religious scriptures. That kind of turned me off. Then I got hold of the books in college and had such a good time reading them, my roommate thought I was weird. I actually fell out of my chair laughing.

Book Review: Lost in a Good Book by Jasper Fforde
Book Reviews / September 4, 2003

This second of the “Thursday Next” adventures that began with The Eyre Affair is exciting, funny and mentally engaging. A romp in an alternative-1985 England, where there are no airplanes and Germany did not lose in World War II; while on the other hand time travel, undead problems, and resequenced mammoths, dodos and Neanderthals are part of every-day life. Everyone is nuts about literature, a whole category of crimes has grown…